Kenny Solomon on the track

#5

Vol_from_86

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#5
He ran 6.88 in the 60. That's around 10.8 in the 100. That's pretty good. The 60 is a weird event, and it really is a lot different than any other Sprint event.
According to Mike Ferrell a 6.88 in the 60 does not equate to 10.8 in the 100. Those are just times.

Whatever that means
 
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#7

WoodsmanVol

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#7
Hope we go fully back to encouraging out football players to be dual sporters. Imagine the stamina and or leaping ability built from track, basketball, soccer, or even rugby. The strength from wrestling and field events like shot put and discus. But I'd want them to stay away from pole-vaulting after some close to fatal mishaps I've seen with broken poles. That to me seems to be happening more than I recall in my generation. I especially like the idea of our basketball capable big men, even if they never got into a game. The stronger legs for leaping to bat down passes, interceptions, busting through or shedding blocks etc. Of course, this may not even be an option for some due to time overlaps from classes and practice times of the sports. BUT I think we'd see fewer players in trouble at late-night parties, being stopped by cops for some driving infraction, and other nighttime fooleries. Or even fewer incidents with those gals who invite them for punch and Judying then claim it was an unprovoked siege on the castle with a cannon.
 
#8

loosecannon

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#8
According to Mike Ferrell a 6.88 in the 60 does not equate to 10.8 in the 100. Those are just times.

Whatever that means
According to Frank Dick's formulas it does. They don't take into account how the runner runs though technique wise. Point was to mainly show people how fast he was running.
 
#11

WBO

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#11
Hey, the bottom line is that he has competitive track speed. The mere fact he's out there on the team demonstrates he's pretty fast compared to the average football player and the technique training he's getting will only make him more efficient in using that speed. The 60 is a "start technique" event. Not all football guys can get to speed quickly just like all track guys can't convert speed to play on the field. If this kid can do it, he could be a shut-down corner on the opposition's speed wr, instead of having to always having to commit a safety over the top to that one wr..

Was a student at UT in the 70's when they had the fastest sprinters in the country led by Reggie Jones. He was a monster, big and very fast. He tied the world record in the 100 meters and led UT to an NC. He anchored the 4X100 and 4X200 relay teams both of which tied world records. Think about that for a minute, a university sprint team that was as fast as the best in the world. Incredible.

He also had beaten the current Olympic Champion from the '72 Olympics, a Russian, who was all technique.

Everything was pointing to Reggie setting a new world record so they did a special 100 yard event at the Dogwood Relays, which at the time was a top national event, and brought in several world class runners. One of those was Ivory Crocket a solid top 10 sprinter who had teased with his competitiveness, but always finished 4th or 5th at world events. I went over to watch (I ran in HS and still enjoyed watching) at the track facility which was packed with national press. Crockett perfectly anticipated the start and just exploded off the line setting a new world record of 9 flat instead of Reggie. I could have sworn he false started, he had at least a 5 yard lead by the 30 yard mark. It was so deflating. (By the way Crockett was from Halls, Tennessee but ran college track at Southern Illinois.)

Bill Battle subsequently convinces Reggie to try out for football team with the idea that he could make it to the pros as a wr like Bob Hayes had done (track athletes weren't allowed to be pros and run in the Olympics back then so there wasn't the ability to make money through track versus the NFL). Reggie gets injured and misses the 1976 Olympic team only to also find out that while he had 9.9 legs, he had 11 flat hands.
 
#12

loosecannon

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#12
Hey, the bottom line is that he has competitive track speed. The mere fact he's out there on the team demonstrates he's pretty fast compared to the average football player and the technique training he's getting will only make him more efficient in using that speed. The 60 is a "start technique" event. Not all football guys can get to speed quickly just like all track guys can't convert speed to play on the field. If this kid can do it, he could be a shut-down corner on the opposition's speed wr, instead of having to always having to commit a safety over the top to that one wr..

Was a student at UT in the 70's when they had the fastest sprinters in the country led by Reggie Jones. He was a monster, big and very fast. He tied the world record in the 100 meters and led UT to an NC. He anchored the 4X100 and 4X200 relay teams both of which tied world records. Think about that for a minute, a university sprint team that was as fast as the best in the world. Incredible.

He also had beaten the current Olympic Champion from the '72 Olympics, a Russian, who was all technique.

Everything was pointing to Reggie setting a new world record so they did a special 100 yard event at the Dogwood Relays, which at the time was a top national event, and brought in several world class runners. One of those was Ivory Crocket a solid top 10 sprinter who had teased with his competitiveness, but always finished 4th or 5th at world events. I went over to watch (I ran in HS and still enjoyed watching) at the track facility which was packed with national press. Crockett perfectly anticipated the start and just exploded off the line setting a new world record of 9 flat instead of Reggie. I could have sworn he false started, he had at least a 5 yard lead by the 30 yard mark. It was so deflating. (By the way Crockett was from Halls, Tennessee but ran college track at Southern Illinois.)

Bill Battle subsequently convinces Reggie to try out for football team with the idea that he could make it to the pros as a wr like Bob Hayes had done (track athletes weren't allowed to be pros and run in the Olympics back then so there wasn't the ability to make money through track versus the NFL). Reggie gets injured and misses the 1976 Olympic team only to also find out that while he had 9.9 legs, he had 11 flat hands.
Sounds like Leonard Scott. I remember they always talked about how fast he was, but didn't produce much.
Also, you are exactly right. The 60 is a technique race that doesn't always translate to the 100 and is especially hard on athletes that don't get to focus on sprinting full-time. It is an indicator of who is a good starter, but to run it competitively, you change phases from the 100 which is where a lot of the variance comes from.
 
#14

feathersax

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#14
Sounds like Leonard Scott. I remember they always talked about how fast he was, but didn't produce much.
Also, you are exactly right. The 60 is a technique race that doesn't always translate to the 100 and is especially hard on athletes that don't get to focus on sprinting full-time. It is an indicator of who is a good starter, but to run it competitively, you change phases from the 100 which is where a lot of the variance comes from.
Leonard Scott could fly! Unfortunately his hands were stone.
 
#16

WBO

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#16
I know I saw Solomon in the field a little. Did he play 4 or less games?
I think they burnt his redshirt by using him on special teams. I thought I saw something where he played in all 11 games. That's one area where he can use his speed. Looking at his recruiting bio it says he was runner-up in South Carolina's 5A 100 meter finals but then says his 40 time is in the high 4.5's.

Pruitt may letting him do this for a couple of reasons, getting his quickness improved and showing recruits he'll let them run track. Fulmer never particularly liked the 2 sport thing, Dooley didn't like anything that might help the team, and Butch, well honestly, I still don't know what Butch liked.
 
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#18
more concerned about how Wideman will/can work out from football to basketball, and see if it really happens...:D

GO BIG ORANGE!!!!!!!!!!!!!
I have the same concern. It seems like the 2 translate pretty well for a WR, but for a guy that has a shot at TE, I wonder if basketball won’t require him to be too slender to be an effective blocker.

Hopefully he finds his niche, with those measurables he has a lot of potential.
 
#19

37620VOL

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#19
I have the same concern. It seems like the 2 translate pretty well for a WR, but for a guy that has a shot at TE, I wonder if basketball won’t require him to be too slender to be an effective blocker.

Hopefully he finds his niche, with those measurables he has a lot of potential.
Grant and Admiral weren't slender.
 
#20

WoodsmanVol

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#20
I have the same concern. It seems like the 2 translate pretty well for a WR, but for a guy that has a shot at TE, I wonder if basketball won’t require him to be too slender to be an effective blocker.

Hopefully he finds his niche, with those measurables he has a lot of potential.
Then there are the Charles Barkley types. Not mention the likes of Blake Griffin and LeBron James muscle men. And we at one time had that big bad guy, Stokes in the Cuonzo Martin tenure. Ain't gotta be skinny to shimmy.
 
#21

Eastknox865

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#21
I have the same concern. It seems like the 2 translate pretty well for a WR, but for a guy that has a shot at TE, I wonder if basketball won’t require him to be too slender to be an effective blocker.

Hopefully he finds his niche, with those measurables he has a lot of potential.
Who are you referring to about playing TE and basketball.
 
#23

loosecannon

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#23
Tyson Gay's fastest time in High School was 10.6.
I know he used steroids later on. But still his training was everybit as good as his talent.
Yes and he devoted his life to track. At the world class level it is very difficult to do both. Not to say you can't be super fast and play football too. Clemson had Spiller and a couple others when I was in college that ran low 10s and played football. I would love to see a bunch of guys on the team fast enough to run track. We have looked a bit slow for years. I remember when we used to run away from teams.
 

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