I would like to thank the Supreme Court, the NCAA, the universities, and players and their parents for ruining college football

EZE

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There already are unions trying to organize at particular schools, as well as organizing across multiple schools. You should review the NLRB complaints.
It will be very hard to ever get to a viable Union IMO with only four years of eligibility for the players. How can the courts enforce any agreement made by a certain group of players against another group 6-10 years later? How do freshmen or other lower value players pay dues?

It’s a huge can of worms that doesn’t have a readily apparent answer to me.
 

Devo182

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Just edit your entire title and replace it with "American capitalism".

Literally any other human being can earn money off their NIL.

The only reason it wasn't this way since the inception is BECAUSE OF THE NCAA (aka the universities) restricting student-athletes in an unconstitutional manner.

You seem to have no concept of the interests of the NCAA/the universities. They would LOVE to control the SAs till the end of time.

Those darn SCOTUS folks and their "rules"...
 
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Devo182

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They actually passed a law today saying that players can only transfer once without penalty. Unless a waiver is given for very specific circumstances, players who transfer more than once must sit out. Which I feel like is an improvement.

Side note: this is not applicable to graduate transfers. Once a player graduates, he is instantly eligible. Call this the "J.T. Daniel's Rule"
Lmfao that's always been the rule. They merely TIGHTENED the WAIVER (not exception) parameters...

Thus why it is called A ONE TIME EXCEPTION...and fwiw that applies and always has to grad players...though many folks still misunderstand this/think of the old rules.

Michelle Hosick of the NCAA has confirmed this personally. People just willingly misunderstand the rules still to this day.
 

kiddiedoc

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Just edit your entire title and replace it with "American capitalism".

Literally any other human being can earn money off their NIL.

The only reason it wasn't this way since the inception is BECAUSE OF THE NCAA (aka the universities) restricting student-athletes in an unconstitutional manner.

You seem to have no concept of the interestd of the NCAA/the universities. They would LOVE to control the SAs till the end of time.

Those darn SCOTUS folks and their "rules"...
I love to hear everyone who is totally able to profit from their skills, names, image, and likeness fuss about football players being allowed to profit from their skills, names, image, and likeness.


It's not going to ruin football. Adapt and stay ahead of the curve.
 

lawgator1

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First, while I'm still unclear on what happened with the UF QB and the $13 million, it does seem from what I'm reading that UF counted on money from a couple of boosters who declined. So at best a miscommunication, but perhaps just completely disorganized in our approach.

Second, I have NEVER said the players don't deserve to get paid what the market will bear. I'm just saying that the consequences of it will change the game as I grew up with it and it's going to suck IMO, when all said and done.

Third, the fan reaction at UF at this point I think is very interesting. A growing sentiment with the fans of screw this guy, he'll be an enormous distraction anyway at this point and cause a lot of resentment in the locker room.
 
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EZE

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First, while I'm still unclear on what happened with the UF QB and the $13 million, it does seem from what I'm reading that UF counted on money from a couple of boosters who declined. So at best a miscommunication, but perhaps just completely disorganized in our approach.

Second, I have NEVER said the players don't deserve to get paid what the market will bear. I'm just saying that the consequences of it will change the game as I grew up with it and it's going to suck IMO, when all said and done.

Third, the fan reaction at UF at this point I think is very interesting. A growing sentiment with the fans of screw this guy, he'll be an enormous distraction anyway at this point and cause a lot of resentment in the locker room.
UF will have to pay someone to play QB…so UF better get it figured out. It’s just the way it is.
 

VFL-82-JP

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First, while I'm still unclear on what happened with the UF QB and the $13 million, it does seem from what I'm reading that UF counted on money from a couple of boosters who declined. So at best a miscommunication, but perhaps just completely disorganized in our approach.

Second, I have NEVER said the players don't deserve to get paid what the market will bear. I'm just saying that the consequences of it will change the game as I grew up with it and it's going to suck IMO, when all said and done.

Third, the fan reaction at UF at this point I think is very interesting. A growing sentiment with the fans of screw this guy, he'll be an enormous distraction anyway at this point and cause a lot of resentment in the locker room.
Glad the lightbulb has come on for you, and you're finally getting your news from more accurate sources.

Your third point is just UF fans tasting sour grapes. They'd love him if he were on board. Since it seems more and more likely he won't be a Florida player, they're convincing themselves they don't want him anyway.

Seen plenty of Vols fans do this with players who left for another school. It's a common reaction.
 
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lawgator1

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Glad the lightbulb has come on for you, and you're finally getting your news from more accurate sources.

Your third point is just UF fans tasting sour grapes. They'd love him if he were on board. Since it seems more and more likely he won't be a Florida player, they're convincing themselves they don't want him anyway.

Seen plenty of Vols fans do this with players who left for another school. It's a common reaction.

Let's think this through. A 5 star qb wants $10 million for NIL. Whats a reasonable amount for a top flight RB? The same? Ok so we are at $20 million.

Let's add $2 million each for a few linemen. A million for some strong defensive secondary players. Let's say $2 million again for WRs and star TE types. Maybe 500k for about each of another 7 to 10 players on your squad.

Could easily be $50 million to buy yourself a nationally competitive team. So yeah, there's some sour grapes. There's also some immediacy to our own situation that maybe brings home to UF fans earlier than most that what we used to know as college football is a shadow of its former self.
 
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kiddiedoc

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Let's think this through. A 5 star qb wants $10 million for NIL. Whats a reasonable amount for a top flight RB? The same? Ok so we are at $20 million.

Let's add $2 million each for a few linemen. A million for some strong defensive secondary players. Let's say $2 million again for WRs and star TE types. Maybe 500k for about each of another 7 to 10 players on your squad.

Could easily be $50 million to buy yourself a nationally competitive team. So yeah, there's some sour grapes. There's also some immediacy to our own situation that maybe brings home to UF fans earlier than most that what we used to know as college football is a shadow of its former self.
Then pony up.
 
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VFL-82-JP

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Let's think this through. A 5 star qb wants $10 million for NIL. Whats a reasonable amount for a top flight RB? The same? Ok so we are at $20 million.

Let's add $2 million each for a few linemen. A million for some strong defensive secondary players. Let's say $2 million again for WRs and star TE types. Maybe 500k for about each of another 7 to 10 players on your squad.

Could easily be $50 million to buy yourself a nationally competitive team. So yeah, there's some sour grapes. There's also some immediacy to our own situation that maybe brings home to UF fans earlier than most that what we used to know as college football is a shadow of its former self.
As a general statement that, "we spend way too much on entertainment as a culture, and not nearly enough on the really important stuff (however each of us define what's really important)," I agree with you. I myself would love if we paid teachers like my wife a helluva lot more than any entertainer. I'd love if we paid cops and firefighters like my brother-in-law a helluva lot more than any singer or actor.

But that's not the world we live in. Collectively, our priorities are different than that.

If you want to protest, here's what you do. Don't watch football ever again. Don't watch any movies. Don't pay for TV. Don't listen to professionally developed music. Take all that money you save, and give it to the folks you say you value most.

Do that, and you're walking the talk. Enough folks join you, and our culture will shift to reflect the collective values.

Until then, it's really just sour grapes.

The market will bear what we collectively decide our entertainment is worth. If that's $50m for the top end college programs, that's what it is. If it turns out to be $100m, well, that's what it is. If it settles down to only be $10m or $20m, ... whatever. Whatever it is, that's what we're collectively saying it's worth to pursue championships.

That may not match the romantic notion of college football you cherish (though reality has always been far less idyllic than the fiction you seem to be clinging to). But it is far from being any kind of death knell for the institution of college football. It is simply evolving, as it has since the sport emerged in the mid-1800s.

 
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lawgator1

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As a general statement that, "we spend way too much on entertainment as a culture, and not nearly enough on the really important stuff (however each of us define what's really important)," I agree with you. I myself would love if we paid teachers like my wife a helluva lot more than any entertainer. I'd love if we paid cops and firefighters like my brother-in-law a helluva lot more than any singer or actor.

But that's not the world we live in. Collectively, our priorities are different than that.

If you want to protest, here's what you do. Don't watch football ever again. Don't watch any movies. Don't pay for TV. Don't listen to professionally developed music. Take all that money you save, and give it to the folks you say you value most.

Do that, and you're walking the talk. Enough folks join you, and our culture will shift to reflect the collective values.

Until then, it's really just sour grapes.

The market will bear what we collectively decide our entertainment is worth. If that's $50m for the top end college programs, that's what it is. If it turns out to be $100m, well, that's what it is. If it settles down to only be $10m or $20m, ... whatever. Whatever it is, that's what we're collectively saying it's worth to pursue championships.

That may not match the romantic notion of college football you cherish (though reality has always been far less idyllic than the fiction you seem to be clinging to). But it is far from being any kind of death knell for the institution of college football. It is simply evolving, as it has since the sport emerged in the mid-1800s.


You know, the sentiment of generally not being as invested in college football as a fan because of all of this is spreading rapidly. It may be happening faster with UF fans because we are seeing the potential for what seems like being held up for more cash as an every year occurrence more immediately than you.

Doesn't mean I won't watch. But does it mean I may not care as much or be as devoted? Buy as much merchandise? Go to games as an alum when I might have the time? I won't rule that out.

I am starting now to think about high school sophomores and juniors being recruited .... not by schools, but by agents. How much is that process going to cost everyone? And while perpetuating the illusion that some kid "has always wanted to be a Gator/Vol/Bulldog!"

And before I am yet again falsely accused of being against the kids being compensated that is just not true. I am in this thread accounting for the changes to the culture of being a college football fan I fear this is going to cause.
 
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swampfoxfan

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As a general statement that, "we spend way too much on entertainment as a culture, and not nearly enough on the really important stuff (however each of us define what's really important)," I agree with you. I myself would love if we paid teachers like my wife a helluva lot more than any entertainer. I'd love if we paid cops and firefighters like my brother-in-law a helluva lot more than any singer or actor.

But that's not the world we live in. Collectively, our priorities are different than that.

If you want to protest, here's what you do. Don't watch football ever again. Don't watch any movies. Don't pay for TV. Don't listen to professionally developed music. Take all that money you save, and give it to the folks you say you value most.

Do that, and you're walking the talk. Enough folks join you, and our culture will shift to reflect the collective values.

Until then, it's really just sour grapes.

The market will bear what we collectively decide our entertainment is worth. If that's $50m for the top end college programs, that's what it is. If it turns out to be $100m, well, that's what it is. If it settles down to only be $10m or $20m, ... whatever. Whatever it is, that's what we're collectively saying it's worth to pursue championships.

That may not match the romantic notion of college football you cherish (though reality has always been far less idyllic than the fiction you seem to be clinging to). But it is far from being any kind of death knell for the institution of college football. It is simply evolving, as it has since the sport emerged in the mid-1800s.

Totally agree
 
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VFL-82-JP

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You know, the sentiment of generally not being as invested in college football as a fan because of all of this is spreading rapidly. It may be happening faster with UF fans because we are seeing the potential for what seems like being held up for more cash as an every year occurrence more immediately than you.

Doesn't mean I won't watch. But does it mean I may not care as much or be as devoted? Buy as much merchandise? Go to games as an alum when I might have the time? I won't rule that out.

I am starting now to think about high school sophomores and juniors being recruited .... not by schools, but by agents. How much is that process going to cost everyone? And while perpetuating the illusion that some kid "has always wanted to be a Gator/Vol/Bulldog!"

And before I am yet again falsely accused of being against the kids being compensated that is just not true. I am in this thread accounting for the changes to the culture of being a college football fan I fear this is going to cause.
Or maybe, just maybe, a lot of the Vols fans here are already way ahead of you in their understanding of the continuing evolution of college football.

Some may think it's great. Others may think it stinks. Most of us are probably somewhere in the middle. Regardless, we may have a better--and healthier--view of where the college game is taking us than a group of fans who have spent the past several days--months, really--complaining about how they're being mistreated by the new developments.

Worth considering, anyway.
 

volfanhill

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You know, the sentiment of generally not being as invested in college football as a fan because of all of this is spreading rapidly. It may be happening faster with UF fans because we are seeing the potential for what seems like being held up for more cash as an every year occurrence more immediately than you.

Doesn't mean I won't watch. But does it mean I may not care as much or be as devoted? Buy as much merchandise? Go to games as an alum when I might have the time? I won't rule that out.

I am starting now to think about high school sophomores and juniors being recruited .... not by schools, but by agents. How much is that process going to cost everyone? And while perpetuating the illusion that some kid "has always wanted to be a Gator/Vol/Bulldog!"

And before I am yet again falsely accused of being against the kids being compensated that is just not true. I am in this thread accounting for the changes to the culture of being a college football fan I fear this is going to cause.
Your problem is that you are lamenting a change in a system that was exploiting these players for decades and limiting their freedoms.
 
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butchna

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You know, the sentiment of generally not being as invested in college football as a fan because of all of this is spreading rapidly. It may be happening faster with UF fans because we are seeing the potential for what seems like being held up for more cash as an every year occurrence more immediately than you.

Doesn't mean I won't watch. But does it mean I may not care as much or be as devoted? Buy as much merchandise? Go to games as an alum when I might have the time? I won't rule that out.

I am starting now to think about high school sophomores and juniors being recruited .... not by schools, but by agents. How much is that process going to cost everyone? And while perpetuating the illusion that some kid "has always wanted to be a Gator/Vol/Bulldog!"

And before I am yet again falsely accused of being against the kids being compensated that is just not true. I am in this thread accounting for the changes to the culture of being a college football fan I fear this is going to cause.
If you're invested, you'll adjust.
 

GAVol

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Yes. A system where someone is banned from earning money off their name, image, or likeness is exploitation. It's un-American. Morally wrong and corrupt
Forget NIL… the AD budget is about $170 million. 85 scholarships plus housing and food is liberally about 3% of that. That’s one heck of a ROI.
 

Milehigh_Vol

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There will be no such thing as loyalty to a program, school, or coach. The best players will force universities into bidding wars. A QB that wins the Heisman as a junior? He'll put himself on the free agency list for the portal the day after the bowls are done. Gone will be the days of sitting in the stands and watching a player progress over 2 to 4 years, maybe 5.

I'm not naive, I know it happened before on a lesser scale when it was not legal to make offers like we see now. But the scope of it now, and the fact that its going to just get worse....

There is no solution. NIL cannot be capped. I don't know, maybe student athletes never really did have much loyalty or allegiance and we romanticized it off the strength of the very few that seemed to embrace it, Peyton Manning, Tim Tebow. But now school fan bases are going to needle each other about how they stole this player or that player.

Time to realize that it was really just all about the show in years past? TV rights, pageantry, fight songs. The whole thing is just so depressing.
The NCAA brought this upon us by fighting over YouTube monetization and ham sandwiches.

Just let the kids be kids and we would never had this problem.
 
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kcvols1

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Forget NIL… the AD budget is about $170 million. 85 scholarships plus housing and food is liberally about 3% of that. That’s one heck of a ROI.
The NCAA brought this upon us by fighting over YouTube monetization and ham sandwiches.

Just let the kids be kids and we would never had this problem.
Don’t forget the schools that collectively supported the NCAA supporting the old system by any means necessary.

Don’t let the greedy off their hook, now! 😉
 

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