How much can Jim Chaney improve the Tennessee offense in year one?

#1

dduncan4163

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#1
How much can Jim Chaney improve the Tennessee offense in year one? Here’s what the numbers tell us


While the Tennessee Volunteers showed plenty of promise on defense in 2018, the offense was a different story. There were plenty of reasons why the Vols finished the 2018 season as one of the nation’s worst offenses. Injuries, inefficiency, lack of talent, mistakes, miscommunications - you name it - this team faced all factors and could not overcome most of them.

Head coach Jeremy Pruitt and offensive coordinator Tyson Helton did not have much chemistry, either. Helton’s offense routinely clashed with Pruitt’s ideologies and the end result was Helton leaving for the head coaching job at Western Kentucky.
Now, I’m not sayin Pruitt drove Helton away, but one would have to think that if there was room for growth at Tennessee, Helton would have stayed. Regardless, what Helton left behind was an offense that finished as the 84th overall team in the nation in terms of OFEI, according to Football Outsiders.

The Vols finished 2018 as one of the least valued offenses, evidenced by their rank of 107 out of 130 teams in the country, according to FO. Their Offensive Efficiency (OE) grade was a measly 1.81, which basically means that the offense didn’t have many drives that scored points, flipped field position, or helped Tennessee gain any significant momentum (or value) from the drive.

Tennessee also didn’t finish better than 101st in any of the other categories outside of the Turnover Rate (OTO), where a 77th finish was the best the team could do. Such categories include first down rate, touchdown rate, ball control rate, and others.

Georgia, on the other hand, finished 2018 as the nation’s third-best overall team in terms of OFEI, fourth-best in terms of OE, and were inside the top-10 of every category except turnover rate, where the Bulldogs finished 11th. Now, this was Chaney’s third year as Georgia’s OC, so he has had to time to implement his system and his players have had time to grow in said system, which is obviously not the case with UT. So, in order to get a more realistic idea of how Chaney could impact this offense, I took a look at his first year as OC at every stop (Tennessee, Arkansas, Pittsburgh, Georgia) and compared it to the program’s previous year of offensive output before Chaney’s arrival. We’ll go in chronological order to keep it simple, starting with Chaney’s first go in Knoxville. Chaney became OC in 2009 when Lane Kiffin was hired to replace Phillip Fulmer. The Vols were abysmal on offense in 2008 despite having a dark horse Heisman Trophy candidate in Arian Foster and all five starters returning on an offensive line that only allowed four sacks in 2007.



Really good read. If the O-Line can be at least servicable. Chaney could have the offense humming by November.

GBO
 
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#2

chrismc1000

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#2
Yea the more and more I think about it 8-4 is doable this season. Should win all 4 OOC games and that leaves Mississippi State, Kentucky, Vandy and South Carolina. I believe Cheney will have us good by the Florida game bc he knows how the rivalry is and what it means to us. After all he basically has 3 off weeks before Florida.
 
#4

XknoxvolsX

The only people who dislike winners are losers!
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#4
Had CLK let him call that play in the Bama game after that long pass instead of laying up for a 50 yard FG with a lame legged kicker, we would have won that game!

Depending on the talent that’s been developed, he should have us better that we’ve been since and before Dobbs.
 
#11

unfrozencvmanvol

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#11
How much can Jim Chaney improve the Tennessee offense in year one? Here’s what the numbers tell us


While the Tennessee Volunteers showed plenty of promise on defense in 2018, the offense was a different story. There were plenty of reasons why the Vols finished the 2018 season as one of the nation’s worst offenses. Injuries, inefficiency, lack of talent, mistakes, miscommunications - you name it - this team faced all factors and could not overcome most of them.

Head coach Jeremy Pruitt and offensive coordinator Tyson Helton did not have much chemistry, either. Helton’s offense routinely clashed with Pruitt’s ideologies and the end result was Helton leaving for the head coaching job at Western Kentucky.
Now, I’m not sayin Pruitt drove Helton away, but one would have to think that if there was room for growth at Tennessee, Helton would have stayed. Regardless, what Helton left behind was an offense that finished as the 84th overall team in the nation in terms of OFEI, according to Football Outsiders.

The Vols finished 2018 as one of the least valued offenses, evidenced by their rank of 107 out of 130 teams in the country, according to FO. Their Offensive Efficiency (OE) grade was a measly 1.81, which basically means that the offense didn’t have many drives that scored points, flipped field position, or helped Tennessee gain any significant momentum (or value) from the drive.

Tennessee also didn’t finish better than 101st in any of the other categories outside of the Turnover Rate (OTO), where a 77th finish was the best the team could do. Such categories include first down rate, touchdown rate, ball control rate, and others.

Georgia, on the other hand, finished 2018 as the nation’s third-best overall team in terms of OFEI, fourth-best in terms of OE, and were inside the top-10 of every category except turnover rate, where the Bulldogs finished 11th. Now, this was Chaney’s third year as Georgia’s OC, so he has had to time to implement his system and his players have had time to grow in said system, which is obviously not the case with UT. So, in order to get a more realistic idea of how Chaney could impact this offense, I took a look at his first year as OC at every stop (Tennessee, Arkansas, Pittsburgh, Georgia) and compared it to the program’s previous year of offensive output before Chaney’s arrival. We’ll go in chronological order to keep it simple, starting with Chaney’s first go in Knoxville. Chaney became OC in 2009 when Lane Kiffin was hired to replace Phillip Fulmer. The Vols were abysmal on offense in 2008 despite having a dark horse Heisman Trophy candidate in Arian Foster and all five starters returning on an offensive line that only allowed four sacks in 2007.



Really good read. If the O-Line can be at least servicable. Chaney could have the offense humming by November.

GBO
Excellent work as always.
 
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#12
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#12
Outstanding ANALysis. The mathematical computations are amazing.

I expect more offense due to experience at QB, running back, and OL. The WR corps leaves nothing to bring worry. I do not expect to see 3 failed "skill" plays followed by a punt. It won't be scoring on each drive but the drives will be enough to flip the field from time to time.
 
#18

Devo182

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#18
Chaney's history typically shows little improvement in Y1, big improvement Y2. But the bar for this offense should be higher. 1)we've been terrible, lots of room to be better, 2) veteran offense. These guys know each other. They don't need a genius playcaller, just any semblance of a run game, starting and ending with the OL in all areas. This is a Friend/OL issue, not as much on Chaney's shoulders right away. His big role will be in elevating us in 2020/2021.
 
#20

Doctrippin

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#20
Chaney's history typically shows little improvement in Y1, big improvement Y2. But the bar for this offense should be higher. 1)we've been terrible, lots of room to be better, 2) veteran offense. These guys know each other. They don't need a genius playcaller, just any semblance of a run game, starting and ending with the OL in all areas. This is a Friend/OL issue, not as much on Chaney's shoulders right away. His big role will be in elevating us in 2020/2021.
Have you also noticed, he doesn't stick in one place very long. 3 or 4 years max.
 
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#21

West Vol

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#21
Have you also noticed, he doesn't stick in one place very long. 3 or 4 years max.
Dooley got fired. Butch didn’t want to retain him or Pittman (should have been a pretty clear early warning sign the man had no clue, considering their replacements). He had to get off a sinking ship at Arky and then Kirby is just awful to work for. I don’t think any of that means he’s some kind of guy that will bounce around necessarily. He spent 8-9 years at Purdue.
 
#25

1vol8

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#25
I don’t expect a huge jump in offensive production. I expect to see Chaney design plays to get the ball out of JGs hands on rhythm. That being said I wouldn’t be surprised to see JGs YPA go down, completion percentage go up and td to int ratio stay around the same. I figure we’ll possibly see us finish around 6th-8th in the SEC until we get some speed on the outside that defenses have to respect. Once that happens there will be a completely different look on offense. Defenses won’t be able to stack the box like they do now opening up running lanes. They won’t be able to bank on the short passing game taking a safety(or 2)out of the box opening up throwing lanes to all 3 levels. The o line suddenly doesn’t have to account for more than expected and looks like a strength rather than a weakness and we can effectively “mix it up” shooting our average PPG from around 20 to about 31. Wishful thinking? Maybe
 
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