Harry Galbreath

#1
Joined
Jan 8, 2021
Messages
598
Likes
1,242
#1
Having been very lucky to spend a lot of time with Coach Fulmer I asked him who the greatest Offensive lineman he ever saw or coached was & he immediately mentioned Harry Galbreath. He said he never saw any defensive lineman ever out muscle or really push him around. Galbreath_Harry.jpg He played in every game of his four-year career as a Volunteer (1984–87), which included being in the starting lineup his last three years. He was only 6'1" x 280 but a boulder of a man.Volunteers' coach Johnny Majors once said that Galbreath was the best run blocker he had ever coached. On the field, Galbreath was aggressive and fundamentally sound, while off the field he garnered first-team All-SEC and first-team All-American honors as a senior in 1987.[2] He also was awarded the prestigious Jacobs Award, given annually to the SEC's top lineman. In 1991, Galbreath was honored further for his career in the orange and white by being named to Tennessee's 100 Year All-Time Team.

After graduating in 1988 with a degree in human services, Galbreath was an 8th-round draft pick (212th overall) of the Miami Dolphins in the NFL Draft. Galbreath was named to the NFL All-Rookie Team in 1988 and played five seasons with the Dolphins before moving on. Galbreath signed with the Green Bay Packers after the 1992 season and played three seasons in Wisconsin (1993–95), then headed east to the New York Jets, where he played one more season (1996) before retiring.

Upon his retirement from the NFL, Galbreath was named offensive line coach at Austin Peay State University, where he remained for two years before moving on to a five-year stint in the same capacity at Tennessee State University. In 2005, he was named offensive line coach at Hampton University. In 2007, he returned to the Volunteers as an associate in the strength and conditioning program.
 
#4

GAVol

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Oct 24, 2003
Messages
105,080
Likes
42,036
#4
I was young, but I remember him. Dude was an absolute road grader. His Senior year was about as good as it gets as far as a running game. It would drive fans crazy, but Majors would give it to Reggie Cobb, get a lead, then start feeding William Howard like a battering ram.
 
#5

BigOrangeAl 1979

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 4, 2019
Messages
2,644
Likes
3,473
#5
I was young, but I remember him. Dude was an absolute road grader. His Senior year was about as good as it gets as far as a running game. It would drive fans crazy, but Majors would give it to Reggie Cobb, get a lead, then start feeding William Howard like a battering ram.
As a young kid I grew up watching great players at UT during that time. Galbreath and Bruce Wilkerson and guys like Keith Delong and Dale Jones and Mark Hovanic.
 
#7

GAVol

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Oct 24, 2003
Messages
105,080
Likes
42,036
#7
As a young kid I grew up watching great players at UT during that time. Galbreath and Bruce Wilkerson and guys like Keith Delong and Dale Jones and Mark Hovanic.
The 80s were fun. We were a little up and down, but hadn't seen enough elite football to get cynical about it or feel entitled to it yet. Plus, we were beating Alabama at times, so everything seemed alright with the world.
 
#13

Sackett

A man needs enemies to keep him wary and strong.
Joined
Aug 8, 2011
Messages
133
Likes
135
#13
He was a Senior during my Freshman year at UT. I saw him often. He and J. J. McCleskey were two of the most nicest football players you could meet. They were both always stopping and talking to everyone and anyone. Both always had a huge smile and were very friendly.
I believe HG also rescued a young female coed. It was on Melrose Ave. on the back side of the library. A young lady was walking along the side walk and some guys pulled up trying to talk to her. The passenger grabbed her as the driver started pulling out. HG, ran over and grabbed her and pulled her away from them.
 
#17

cobbwebb0710

Believe the Heup
Joined
Feb 1, 2011
Messages
4,315
Likes
5,111
#17
As a young kid I grew up watching great players at UT during that time. Galbreath and Bruce Wilkerson and guys like Keith Delong and Dale Jones and Mark Hovanic.
God, you just brought a tear to my eye! Man those were the days. We may have lost some games but I guarantee the other team knew they were in a damn war!
GBO!!
 
#20

LibertyVolance

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2006
Messages
1,297
Likes
1,115
#20
The 80s were fun. We were a little up and down, but hadn't seen enough elite football to get cynical about it or feel entitled to it yet. Plus, we were beating Alabama at times, so everything seemed alright with the world.
I loved the pitch sweeps. Those OLinemen were laying out defenders 15-20-25 yds down the field. If a run game can be pretty, those teams were masters of it. Recalling guys like Johnny Jones, Reggie Cobb, Chuck Webb, Charlie Garner....whoa. We had great backs and road grading OLines. Those were my favorite Vol memories by far.
 
#21

ChiefTKE

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2010
Messages
553
Likes
1,119
#21
Having been very lucky to spend a lot of time with Coach Fulmer I asked him who the greatest Offensive lineman he ever saw or coached was & he immediately mentioned Harry Galbreath. He said he never saw any defensive lineman ever out muscle or really push him around. View attachment 352254 He played in every game of his four-year career as a Volunteer (1984–87), which included being in the starting lineup his last three years. He was only 6'1" x 280 but a boulder of a man.Volunteers' coach Johnny Majors once said that Galbreath was the best run blocker he had ever coached. On the field, Galbreath was aggressive and fundamentally sound, while off the field he garnered first-team All-SEC and first-team All-American honors as a senior in 1987.[2] He also was awarded the prestigious Jacobs Award, given annually to the SEC's top lineman. In 1991, Galbreath was honored further for his career in the orange and white by being named to Tennessee's 100 Year All-Time Team.

After graduating in 1988 with a degree in human services, Galbreath was an 8th-round draft pick (212th overall) of the Miami Dolphins in the NFL Draft. Galbreath was named to the NFL All-Rookie Team in 1988 and played five seasons with the Dolphins before moving on. Galbreath signed with the Green Bay Packers after the 1992 season and played three seasons in Wisconsin (1993–95), then headed east to the New York Jets, where he played one more season (1996) before retiring.

Upon his retirement from the NFL, Galbreath was named offensive line coach at Austin Peay State University, where he remained for two years before moving on to a five-year stint in the same capacity at Tennessee State University. In 2005, he was named offensive line coach at Hampton University. In 2007, he returned to the Volunteers as an associate in the strength and conditioning program.
Harry was also a great human being. I got to meet him once when he had us come look at one of his players at TSU and he introduced us to my new favorite restaurant in Nashville, Monell's. He could put down some food...lol. I remember there used to be a picture of him in the OL room at UT in his packer uniform referencing his record for pancake blocks. R.I.P., Harry!
 
#23

photovol

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 17, 2012
Messages
16,351
Likes
8,776
#23
As a young kid I grew up watching great players at UT during that time. Galbreath and Bruce Wilkerson and guys like Keith Delong and Dale Jones and Mark Hovanic.


And Bobby Scott,
I asked Fulmer the same question several years ago and he mentioned some of the great ones like Harry and the others but said Raleigh McKenzie may have been the best overall


Tennessee used to have NFL players all over the lineup and the SEC took notice, but those days are long gone, unfortunately
 

VN Store


Sponsors
 

Top