Former Lady Vols are excited for the program!!

#3

LVsinceJV

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#3
Interesting quote from Glory Johnson:

When Johnson was asked about the coaching change, she suggested that the players—not the head coach—would be the most important factor in making the program elite again. She explained:

“For me, it’s not really [about] who’s the coach. It’s more of, who is going to respect the coach that is there, right? It doesn’t matter who the coach is, you know? People would work hard for Pat because she was Pat. When we were there, we worked hard for Holly because she was Holly. And we [were] trying to carry on Pat’s legacy. … So as much as the new coach should bring change, the players got to step up. The players got to step up and they also have to understand that even though Pat’s not there, you still have a job to do, and it’s for Pat. … players got to step up a little bit and take a little responsibility because it’s not about anybody else but Pat at that point.”
Maybe I'm reading this funny, but this is a bizarre reaction from Glory, imo.
 
#5

lvocd

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#5
Interesting quote from Glory Johnson:

When Johnson was asked about the coaching change, she suggested that the players—not the head coach—would be the most important factor in making the program elite again. She explained:

“For me, it’s not really [about] who’s the coach. It’s more of, who is going to respect the coach that is there, right? It doesn’t matter who the coach is, you know? People would work hard for Pat because she was Pat. When we were there, we worked hard for Holly because she was Holly. And we [were] trying to carry on Pat’s legacy. … So as much as the new coach should bring change, the players got to step up. The players got to step up and they also have to understand that even though Pat’s not there, you still have a job to do, and it’s for Pat. … players got to step up a little bit and take a little responsibility because it’s not about anybody else but Pat at that point.”
Maybe I'm reading this funny, but this is a bizarre reaction from Glory, imo.
Remember, Glory never played for HEAD COACH Holly Warlick, so she has no personal knowledge of what playing for a head coach who routinely admits that she "doesn't know" what to do is like. Only the players who came after Glory had graduated came to understand that it actually DOES matter who the coach is.
 
#6

Amb3096

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#6
Remember, Glory never played for HEAD COACH Holly Warlick, so she has no personal knowledge of what playing for a head coach who routinely admits that she "doesn't know" what to do is like. Only the players who came after Glory had graduated came to understand that it actually DOES matter who the coach is.
I thought that Holly was the de facto head coach during Glory's senior year?

Seems that a lot of former players have a hard time in admitting that change needed to made to the coaching staff.
 
#8

Franklin Pierce

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#8
Interesting quote from Glory Johnson:

When Johnson was asked about the coaching change, she suggested that the players—not the head coach—would be the most important factor in making the program elite again. She explained:

“For me, it’s not really [about] who’s the coach. It’s more of, who is going to respect the coach that is there, right? It doesn’t matter who the coach is, you know? People would work hard for Pat because she was Pat. When we were there, we worked hard for Holly because she was Holly. And we [were] trying to carry on Pat’s legacy. … So as much as the new coach should bring change, the players got to step up. The players got to step up and they also have to understand that even though Pat’s not there, you still have a job to do, and it’s for Pat. … players got to step up a little bit and take a little responsibility because it’s not about anybody else but Pat at that point.”
Maybe I'm reading this funny, but this is a bizarre reaction from Glory, imo.
To call Glory Johnson's statement, BIZARRE, is stupid.
 
#9

creekdipper

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#9
I thought Cheridene's comments are the most relevant since she ended her career at the end of the Warlick era and experienced that firsthand, knows the returning players and has seen how they relate to Kellie, and wishes she could have played for Kellie. The views of past LV standouts are valuable but nothing to match those of someone who has just completed her playing years and understands the mindsets of her teammates. It bodes well for the immediate future re: players' attitudes.
 
#10

BeecherVol

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#10
To call Glory Johnson's statement, BIZARRE, is stupid.
I wouldn't describe them as bizarre, but the following statement
It doesn’t matter who the coach is, you know? People would work hard for Pat because she was Pat.
defeated the idea that the players are more important and the coach really doesn't matter in a coaching change.

Players (of a particular ability and personality) flocked to Pat in the same way they do to Saban in football. They didn't just show up to the first practice and figure out who they were playing for, then decide whether to buy in and work hard.
 
#11

lvocd

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#11
I wouldn't describe them as bizarre, but the following statement defeated the idea that the players are more important and the coach really doesn't matter in a coaching change.

Players (of a particular ability and personality) flocked to Pat in the same way they do to Saban in football. They didn't just show up to the first practice and figure out who they were playing for, then decide whether to buy in and work hard.
Exactly. I read that and thought, "Glory, you just inadvertently illustrated EXACTLY how much a coach matters."

But we can all be generous here in acknowledging the difficult position all Lady Vols are in -- both past and current -- in regard to discussing the coaching change. They are all "sisters," and as such, even if they'd had concerns about the prior staff -- three of which were former beloved Lady Vol players -- I'm sure they'd rather not ever criticize any of their own publicly.
 
#12

GameTime

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#12
A coach has more to do with court success, than just some clothes on the sidelines.....They call the offensive sets, defensive pressure packages, substitutions, set the tone in practice for the game situations....A hell of a lot more than someone that just blows a whistle.

I'm looking forward to a new beginning.....The last product was not real successful.
 
#13

sisaq

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#13
Exactly. I read that and thought, "Glory, you just inadvertently illustrated EXACTLY how much a coach matters."

But we can all be generous here in acknowledging the difficult position all Lady Vols are in -- both past and current -- in regard to discussing the coaching change. They are all "sisters," and as such, even if they'd had concerns about the prior staff -- three of which were former beloved Lady Vol players -- I'm sure they'd rather not ever criticize any of their own publicly.
She maintained that "players would work hard because it's Pat" tells me that what she was insinuating is that a great coach should make players work hard. This is why I like ppl who say the truth but keeps it respectful.
 
#16

BeecherVol

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#16
Exactly. I read that and thought, "Glory, you just inadvertently illustrated EXACTLY how much a coach matters."

But we can all be generous here in acknowledging the difficult position all Lady Vols are in -- both past and current -- in regard to discussing the coaching change. They are all "sisters," and as such, even if they'd had concerns about the prior staff -- three of which were former beloved Lady Vol players -- I'm sure they'd rather not ever criticize any of their own publicly.
I dont expect any former players regardless of era to take shots publically at Holly or Kelly for that matter. Both are from the same fraternity. And while Holly didnt work out, shes still a Vol. She had the more difficult (impossible in some ways) job of being the immediate predecessor. And while no one was holding her to same bar to be considered a success, it was still a mountain to climb.

Holly wasnt Pat. Kelly wont be either, but she has a chance to make her own positive mark on the program.

The comments quoted above seem to point at the idea that she didnt want to throw shade either direction but the idea she used to do that didnt make sense.
 
#17

teacherdean

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#17
I wouldn't describe them as bizarre, but the following statement defeated the idea that the players are more important and the coach really doesn't matter in a coaching change.

Players (of a particular ability and personality) flocked to Pat in the same way they do to Saban in football. They didn't just show up to the first practice and figure out who they were playing for, then decide whether to buy in and work hard.
No matter the sport, it matters who the head coach is. Respect is not something you receive as a matter of fact, you earn respect. In Holly's case she did not seem to have the able to get players to play up to their best and sometimes beyond. That takes a special person who has the ability to demand your best while showing you respect. They know how to admonish without belittling their players. You can't always be a good guy and pat players on the back no matter how they perform. They have to know you care but will not deal with unnecessary B.S.
 
#19

savannahfan

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#19
Nearly all the comments in this article (and several responses by posters) lead me to believe they should all be running for public office. A whole lot of nothing said about the subject and nothing said by posters in response to their nothing said.
 
#21

creekdipper

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#21
Nearly all the comments in this article (and several responses by posters) lead me to believe they should all be running for public office. A whole lot of nothing said about the subject and nothing said by posters in response to their nothing said.
Nothin' from nothin' leaves nothin'
Ya gotta have somethin' if ya wanna be with me....


Or, as another wise person opined,

Ought 'n' ought makes nought.
 
#22
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#22
No matter the sport, it matters who the head coach is. Respect is not something you receive as a matter of fact, you earn respect. In Holly's case she did not seem to have the able to get players to play up to their best and sometimes beyond. That takes a special person who has the ability to demand your best while showing you respect. They know how to admonish without belittling their players. You can't always be a good guy and pat players on the back no matter how they perform. They have to know you care but will not deal with unnecessary B.S.

Dam right!

When I have a meeting with a new team this is part of my discussion with my new players...
I tell them:
"Respect is given, then earned, then earned, then earned,,and on.......it is never given from that person again,,only earned"

td,,,you are right...The right words can be very effective.
the wrong words, equally so

Not just Holly, but that staff had no one who had that capacity.
If they had of had, they would have had a monster team.

Players respect the coach they can't impress consistently.
The secret is, the coach has to continually impress them!
 
#23
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#23
Interesting quote from Glory Johnson:

When Johnson was asked about the coaching change, she suggested that the players—not the head coach—would be the most important factor in making the program elite again. She explained:

“For me, it’s not really [about] who’s the coach. It’s more of, who is going to respect the coach that is there, right? It doesn’t matter who the coach is, you know? People would work hard for Pat because she was Pat. When we were there, we worked hard for Holly because she was Holly. And we [were] trying to carry on Pat’s legacy. … So as much as the new coach should bring change, the players got to step up. The players got to step up and they also have to understand that even though Pat’s not there, you still have a job to do, and it’s for Pat. … players got to step up a little bit and take a little responsibility because it’s not about anybody else but Pat at that point.”
Maybe I'm reading this funny, but this is a bizarre reaction from Glory, imo.
And by the way,,,when I say "Just because they were a great players...doesn't mean they will be a great coach"...this would be one example.

The players did "step up" and try to "do the job"
I was there,,,15 rows up
The players started games and tried to play with effort
Management failed in this crew...The crew tried.
I was there. I saw the effort.
It was the the erratic subbing, the not calling "time-outs" to try to interrupt or stop runs,,The frustration of them looking to the sidelines only to see hands in the air, crossed or on the hips.,,,more...

Want to look at who needed to "step up"
don't look on the court,
look at the sidelines...7 years later, the same lack of in-game management
That is where the "step up" was needed

Welcome, again, Coach K!
 

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