Doctors of VN

utchs81

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Picture looks like olecranon bursitis, but also sounds like you could have torn your triceps. Triceps attaches to your olecranon. The bruising sounds more like a triceps injury but could be a mix of both. I’d probably send you to PT as long as you didn’t completely rupture your triceps (doesn’t sound like you did).
What I can see from the picture the muscle bellys appear to be in good position. Doubt a tendon rupture, due to pain would be significant with that injury. Olecranon Bursitis is most likely and after 2 months is unlikely to be infectious which is more serious. If you have a good family doc he should be able to take care of it otherwise ortho or sports medicine might be best.
 
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golfballs

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Anyone w a breastfed newborn been told to supplement w vitamin D drops? We weren’t told w our older child who is just a couple years older. But the way the pediatrician told us seemed like we should have been so I didn’t ask. Maybe something to do w being born in the winter?
 

VolNExile

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Anyone w a breastfed newborn been told to supplement w vitamin D drops? We weren’t told w our older child who is just a couple years older. But the way the pediatrician told us seemed like we should have been so I didn’t ask. Maybe something to do w being born in the winter?
The born in winter part makes sense. Not enough sunlight to make natural vitamin D creation. Ask the doc?

—oops sorry, I’m not a doctor.
 

golfballs

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I’ve definitely heard of it, so not uncommon, but I don’t know what makes a physician prescribe it. Signs/symptoms/lab tests vs. just smart to do this.

Congratulations on the new one!
Thank you. Just seems weird to think that most breastmilk is deficient somehow. I always thought breastmilk fed babies were used as a baseline for evaluating health and nutrition. How is it determined that it’s not sufficient?
 

VolNExile

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Thank you. Just seems weird to think that most breastmilk is deficient somehow. I always thought breastmilk fed babies were used as a baseline for evaluating health and nutrition. How is it determined that it’s not sufficient?
Vitamin D is one of those lab and nutritional markers that keep shifting. The recommended levels of vitamin D were increased several (8? 10?) years ago, to where I was suddenly diagnosed as vit-D deficient and put on supplements.

It’s a fat-soluble vitamin, unlike water-soluble vitamins like vitamin-B complex. It might be that if the nursing mom isn’t getting enough dietary vit-D for two that the baby is a bit shortchanged. Or it could also be just a moving of the goalposts.

Did your new one have any issues with jaundice, or go under phototherapy (“bili”) lights?

—Anxiously awaiting input from an MD/DO, lol.
 

VolNExile

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Thank you. Just seems weird to think that most breastmilk is deficient somehow. I always thought breastmilk fed babies were used as a baseline for evaluating health and nutrition. How is it determined that it’s not sufficient?
—and to add, breast-fed babies are absolutely the marker for optimum infant nutrition. But it means that the mom’s nutrition is sufficient to cover both her and the infant.

Good for you guys for choosing breast-feeding! It’s what our bodies were designed for. I’m sure y’all will do great. 💕
 

golfballs

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Vitamin D is one of those lab and nutritional markers that keep shifting. The recommended levels of vitamin D were increased several (8? 10?) years ago, to where I was suddenly diagnosed as vit-D deficient and put on supplements.

It’s a fat-soluble vitamin, unlike water-soluble vitamins like vitamin-B complex. It might be that if the nursing mom isn’t getting enough dietary vit-D for two that the baby is a bit shortchanged. Or it could also be just a moving of the goalposts.

Did your new one have any issues with jaundice, or go under phototherapy (“bili”) lights?

—Anxiously awaiting input from an MD/DO, lol.
No issues. Very healthy and has blown past the growth expectations. Mom is healthy and still takes prenatal vitamins
 
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ABINGDON VOL FAN

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I have a question for any medical professionals here regarding the Covid vaccine. My Mom is 86 with advanced dementia and frail health because of her age. Non-smoker. She is schedule to be vaccinated this week. Does anyone see any problems with that?

I am 59 with a minor history of slow developing rash reactions to Relaven(arthritis) and Hydroclorazide (BP). I have heard or read some reports of people with prior allergic reactions having severe allergic reactions to the Covid vaccine. Do you believe the risk for me is too high to take the vaccine? Of course I will listen to my own doctors but would appreciate any feedback from medical professionals on VN.
 
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VolNExile

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I have a question for any medical professionals here regarding the Covid vaccine. My Mom is 86 with advanced dementia and frail health because of her age. Non-smoker. She is schedule to be vaccinated this week. Does anyone see any problems with that?

I am 59 with a minor history of slow developing rash reactions to Relaven(arthritis) and Hydroclorazide (BP). I have saw some reports of people with prior allergic reactions having allergic reactions to the Covid vaccine. Do you believe the risk for me is too high to take the vaccine. Of course I will listen to my own doctors but would appreciate any feedback from medical professionals in VN.
Again, not a doc, but my 93-year-old mom got her first round (I think Moderna, sure wouldn’t swear to it), and will get the second one next week. She sailed through the first (didn’t remember it when I visited the next day, sad lol.) I know that we don’t know the possible long-term complications of the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines, but we DO know what happens to the elderly when they have severe cases of Covid. It’s a horrible way to die.

I’ll let the physicians comment on your own case. I’ll be trying to get my appointment beginning Feb 1.

I completely understand how young and healthy individuals might want to wait on the Johnson and Johnson vaccine when it comes out.

For those who don’t get the vapors at the thought of reading something from the NY Times, I found this interesting: Underselling the Vaccine
 

ABINGDON VOL FAN

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Again, not a doc, but my 93-year-old mom got her first round (I think Moderna, sure wouldn’t swear to it), and will get the second one next week. She sailed through the first (didn’t remember it when I visited the next day, sad lol.) I know that we don’t know the possible long-term complications of the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines, but we DO know what happens to the elderly when they have severe cases of Covid. It’s a horrible way to die.

I’ll let the physicians comment on your own case. I’ll be trying to get my appointment beginning Feb 1.

I completely understand how young and healthy individuals might want to wait on the Johnson and Johnson vaccine when it comes out.

For those who don’t get the vapors at the thought of reading something from the NY Times, I found this interesting: Underselling the Vaccine
Thanks for responding. I’ll read your reference.
 
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VolNExile

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Thanks for responding. I’ll read your reference.
I know you’ve had allergic reactions to prescribed medicines. Have you ever had a reaction to a vaccination? (They don’t necessarily overlap.) If they clear you, they might ask that you hang around for 30 minutes instead of 15. Just be sure that wherever you get it (if you get it), they have epinephrine etc on hand.

Whatever guidance you get, best of luck to you and your mom! I hope we’re going to be seeing the light at the end of the tunnel pretty soon.
 
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Persian Vol

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I have a question for any medical professionals here regarding the Covid vaccine. My Mom is 86 with advanced dementia and frail health because of her age. Non-smoker. She is schedule to be vaccinated this week. Does anyone see any problems with that?

I am 59 with a minor history of slow developing rash reactions to Relaven(arthritis) and Hydroclorazide (BP). I have heard or read some reports of people with prior allergic reactions having severe allergic reactions to the Covid vaccine. Do you believe the risk for me is too high to take the vaccine? Of course I will listen to my own doctors but would appreciate any feedback from medical professionals on VN.
There is absolutely zero problem with her or yourself getting the vaccine. The reports of severe anaphylactic reactions are incredibly rare. “During December 14–23, 2020, monitoring by the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System detected 21 cases of anaphylaxis after administration of a reported 1,893,360 first doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine (11.1 cases per million doses)”. As you can see, incredibly unlikely. And for those who got the severe reaction they were promptly treated and are doing fine. That leaves 99.9999% percent of the rest with a sore arm and possibly some flu like symptoms for 24 hours after the second dose. In return you get 95% immunity from of a disease that can cause significant long term health effects and potentially death. There is significantly higher risk to not taking the vaccine than to taking it. I am a third year medical student for what it’s worth.
 

ABINGDON VOL FAN

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There is absolutely zero problem with her or yourself getting the vaccine. The reports of severe anaphylactic reactions are incredibly rare. “During December 14–23, 2020, monitoring by the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System detected 21 cases of anaphylaxis after administration of a reported 1,893,360 first doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine (11.1 cases per million doses)”. As you can see, incredibly unlikely. And for those who got the severe reaction they were promptly treated and are doing fine. That leaves 99.9999% percent of the rest with a sore arm and possibly some flu like symptoms for 24 hours after the second dose. In return you get 95% immunity from of a disease that can cause significant long term health effects and potentially death. There is significantly higher risk to not taking the vaccine than to taking it. I am a third year medical student for what it’s worth.
Thanks for the info.
 
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kiddiedoc

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Anyone w a breastfed newborn been told to supplement w vitamin D drops? We weren’t told w our older child who is just a couple years older. But the way the pediatrician told us seemed like we should have been so I didn’t ask. Maybe something to do w being born in the winter?
Breastmilk is, in fact, deficient in Vit D. We recommend all breastfed babies to take a Vit D supplement. Infant formula is fortified with it. Our bodies are also able to derive the vitamin from cholesterol via a reaction requiring sunlight.
 

goldenvol

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@kiddiedoc and other doctors of volnation I have a question concerning my 7 yr old boy.

My son has an issue where he has to clear his throat/grunt alot. His pediatrician seemed to think as we did that is was acid reflux. I still feel that it could be that, but I'm honestly leaning to the thought its something with his throat/sinuses. He's getting old enough that he can describe his symptoms better. He says his throat feels like it is full of snot or has a bubble in it. That makes me feel like he has swollen tissue of some kind. When he was a baby he had Laryngeomalacia with bad stridor. He seemed to grow out of that as his pediatrician said he would. I'm wondering does he still have some kind of throat issue or allergy that may create this symptom.

His only known allergy is Red 40, but we've never really found out what else he could be allergic to because we figured out the red 40 thing on our own. The reason I dont feel it's just acid reflux is because he doesn't complain with any burning or burping up acid when he has these grunting fits. His pediatrician says he has a touch of asthma, but I cant remember him ever having a full blown attack. If he has it it's mild.

I've considered Turrets and maybe the grunting is a tick, but I dont think that's what it is. My nephew had a mild case of Turrets and he would grunt but he would blink his eyes and twitch his face. My old boss had a tick and I knew the first time I met him that he had Turrets by the way his ticks were. So, I've been around Turrets and what my son does isn't a tick.

His pediatrician said the next step was going down his throat which requires putting him to sleep which I would like to avoid if at all possible.

Has anyone else seen these type issues before ? Any suggestions on something else to try. I've considered taking him to an allergist to figure out what he's allergic too.
 

Carl Pickens

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You shouldn't have to ask too many questions. Expect an echo. With a normal EKG and Holter, and assuming a normal echo, you are most likely experiencing some anxiety/panic-type reaction, and the fight or flight adrenergic response is only intensifying your disconcerting heart beats.

If, indeed, everything looks OK, I can recommend a couple of good resources to deal with anxiety without medication.
A nice liquor drank and a little crazy weed can do wonders
 

goldenvol

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Is it more prevalent after eating/drinking?
This sounds bad, but my answer would be a guess. He does it so often it's hard for us to guage what sets it off.

After I posted I noticed he had stopped doing it. I asked my wife what all she gave him and it was a big mix. I suggested an anti-inflammatory, so ibuprofen. Claritin and he had some benadryl in his system from earlier. That's 2 antihistamines. I think she had also have him a puff off of his inhaler and he had his stomach pill omeprazole. So something in that mix had his grunting settled down.
 

kiddiedoc

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@kiddiedoc and other doctors of volnation I have a question concerning my 7 yr old boy.

My son has an issue where he has to clear his throat/grunt alot. His pediatrician seemed to think as we did that is was acid reflux. I still feel that it could be that, but I'm honestly leaning to the thought its something with his throat/sinuses. He's getting old enough that he can describe his symptoms better. He says his throat feels like it is full of snot or has a bubble in it. That makes me feel like he has swollen tissue of some kind. When he was a baby he had Laryngeomalacia with bad stridor. He seemed to grow out of that as his pediatrician said he would. I'm wondering does he still have some kind of throat issue or allergy that may create this symptom.

His only known allergy is Red 40, but we've never really found out what else he could be allergic to because we figured out the red 40 thing on our own. The reason I dont feel it's just acid reflux is because he doesn't complain with any burning or burping up acid when he has these grunting fits. His pediatrician says he has a touch of asthma, but I cant remember him ever having a full blown attack. If he has it it's mild.

I've considered Turrets and maybe the grunting is a tick, but I dont think that's what it is. My nephew had a mild case of Turrets and he would grunt but he would blink his eyes and twitch his face. My old boss had a tick and I knew the first time I met him that he had Turrets by the way his ticks were. So, I've been around Turrets and what my son does isn't a tick.

His pediatrician said the next step was going down his throat which requires putting him to sleep which I would like to avoid if at all possible.

Has anyone else seen these type issues before ? Any suggestions on something else to try. I've considered taking him to an allergist to figure out what he's allergic too.
It could be what is known as a "simple motor tic." Very common in childhood, usually just resolves with time. Most do not go on to develop full-blown Tourette's.
 

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