California governor signs image and likeness bill

VolRoger

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If this spreads, I think it will be detrimental to the sport, but at least interesting to watch. For a school like us, it would probably be beneficial. It's going to be wildly abused, and a school like UT with major boosters who has been in a down cycle would likely pay big money for "endorsements" and the like to sign top 10 classes. I still think it would be a disaster long run. I realize the school can't directly pay, but if the bagmen and boosters no longer have to operate in the shadows, why not go all out and get your money's worth to ensure those 4 and 5 star recruits come to your school of choice?

Your logic here is pretty sound I think. My only question is really how long can this methodology for pay to play last? Besides a top 10 class, what do these private donors and organization ultimately get as an ROI? Let's take UT for moment. There are two major donors on a level by themselves to the university. Obviously, there's some other big donors, but I think their a level down. The two are the owners of Dish Network and Pilot. My understanding is that the owner of Dish doesn't really actively take a financial role in UT football although you see the Vols a lot in his commercials. The owner of Pilot is a totally different story. But just for argument, let's say that Charlie Ergen and Jimmy Haslam cooperate and pay the players for advertisement of their products. Don't you think they will feel much more entitled than ever before to have a greater say so in what happens with UT football. They'll certainly have more leverage. Even the Charlie Anderson's and Thunder Thornton's level will demand a greater piece of who the AD is as well as howthe football team is managed. I know that happens now, but it may escalate into a situation where these guys deem themselves owners of the school ala Jerry Jones.
 

SprocketRocket

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I get your argument about the current business model of universities needing to go away. I probably agree with that. What I don't understand is your logic about an individual school having a choice to allow or restrict payment of its players. Why would LSU, for instance, ever decide that they are not going to allow their players to earn money in this manner when schools like Arkansas, Texas A&M, Alabama, Georgia, Florida, etc. chooses to do so? Wouldn't that put LSU at a decidedly bad recruiting disadvantage? With all due respect to the 2nd poster you quoted in your response, I think it is extremely naive to believe that players want to only go to school because of the degree, especially the best players. It is a Pandora's box that is unavoidable. I don't care what Dabo Swinney of Clemson, OSU, or any other school says today. That's just posturing. College P5 football is too big a business with too much revenue coming in to allow those $$$ to dry up at individual schools who refuse to change with the times. I think most people if they're honest knew this day was coming whether they welcomed it or dreaded it. You simply can't continue to have these incredibly massive conference TV deals, huge coaching salaries for the HC AND now staff, apparel deals, that the school and it's staff benefit from IMMEDIATELY while the players, 90% or more of which never make it to the pros, are told their benefit comes later, much later for most if at all. That said, I don't like the direction this has taken to get us to paying players, but let's be honest. The NFL was never going to do what was right and form a minor league system model similar to the major league baseball model. Now, they won't have to. I think this methodology has the potential to create upheaval, dissension, and disruption in the sport, conferences, between universities, and within the team's chemistry. The NFL and the colleges and universities should be paying players deemed worthy by their talent with a salary structure.
I don't disagree with what you are saying about players deserving to be paid, but unless the NCAA changes it's stance on players receiving additional benefits, they would be deemed ineligible. I can't imagine that colleges would be willing to take the risk of playing players when they know they are ineligible.
 

LSU-SIU

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I get your argument about the current business model of universities needing to go away. I probably agree with that. What I don't understand is your logic about an individual school having a choice to allow or restrict payment of its players. Why would LSU, for instance, ever decide that they are not going to allow their players to earn money in this manner when schools like Arkansas, Texas A&M, Alabama, Georgia, Florida, etc. chooses to do so? .
As a generalization, I'm saying the school can probably set reasonable standards as to what they want a person or to do or must not do to participate in a school activity or function, its not up to us to determine that. Of course, this will or potentially will set back schools that want to restrict the athlete as far a payments, employment, etc. But those differences already exist i.e. the Ivy League football scholarships are not allowed as far as I know. I am not saying this won't effect balances, most probably it will, not sure I have an easy solution. Some states might actually start to go after the schools and require payment as "employees", each state is different so I'll leave it to them.

Yes, a storm is coming but not sure there is anything that can be done about that.

For the record:
- I don't think players necessarily need to be paid by the schools, each State is different and the circumstances are different - but its possible under Law some might need to be paid
- I generally have no legal issue with individual schools setting standards for participation
- I have no idea as to what the schools through the NCAA think they can restrict trade and conspire to create a system where they set pay or non-payment rules for individual players

This is going to be a tough road in the future.
 

TUSKtimes

Riding The Wave
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If nothing else, going forward, we are going to get some really cool definitions of amateurism. We are going to see the handiwork of agents and lawyers and agents who are actually lawyers, at their ambulance-chasing best.

I've watched the power of endorsement deals chase elite pro athletes out of small markets for decades. And even though I'm generally careful where I tend to put my belief system, I'm a true believer in the qualities that make up a good "Advertising Sponsor" as they come crawling out of the woodwork.

They will continue to invest their millions of advertising dollars believing that actually entitles them to control and influence "their" clients.

Think Adidas, on steroids.
 

Rasputin_Vol

How dare you?
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