BasketVols in the NBA

VolGee4

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 11, 2012
Messages
26,100
Likes
32,471
Bad trade for the trailblazers imo. Not bc of Keon or anything just in general
They appear to be rebuilding their pieces around Lillard and McCollum. They aren’t going to win anything this year. They got off of Norman Powell’s contract, which goes through 25-26. They got Bledsoe and Winslow, whose contracts are up in one more year and may be more trade bait with expiring contracts.
 

Berry4Heisman14

Will we ever be relevant again?
Joined
Aug 8, 2009
Messages
11,232
Likes
9,843
They appear to be rebuilding their pieces around Lillard and McCollum. They aren’t going to win anything this year. They got off of Norman Powell’s contract, which goes through 25-26. They got Bledsoe and Winslow, whose contracts are up in one more year and may be more trade bait with expiring contracts.
Lillard isn’t getting any younger. They rebuild too long and he will waste his time there
 

turbovol

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 8, 2021
Messages
563
Likes
1,043

The question is, can one develop faster playing everyday at a major college (practice and games) or by practicing in the NBA, getting a few minutes in games--and I guess also summer league. I don't think NBA teams practice that much--given the grind of a long season, with games every 2/3 days. It's a moot point, really, as anybody who's going to be drafted in the 1st round--and probably the 2nd round as well--is going to take the money, and the should. You could return to college, blow out your knee or suffer another injury and see the financial windfall you turned down go poof!

That said, this NBA habit of drafting guys on their future potential seems mostly stupid, as a very large percentage of 1 and Done's never develop sufficiently to become a regular NBA starter. The league is full of them--and most spend most of their time riding the pine. And that's fine, too--if you are doing enough to stay in the league, as even players at the end of the bench are often making a few million. They also get traded a lot.

On another note, nice to see Grant Williams and Josh Richardson each having a pretty solid season thus far with the Celtics. Both are reserves for the Celtics, but get extensive minutes. Indeed, they are Boston's two most valuable reserves, I believe. Grant lost a lot of weight and has become a solid 3-point shooter. Richardson--after a pretty terrible year in Dallas--does a little bit of everything for the Celtics, and is shooting better than he has since he was in Miami. There have been reports that the Celtics have been exploring ways to trade him and the team's backup point guard--but most Boston fans think the team should hold onto Richardson, partly because he's making (only) roughly $10 million, I believe, and that is considered good value. I hope they do hold onto him: Another trade would make him another NBA journeyman. Nobody likes being traded every year.
 

beachvol23

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 5, 2008
Messages
904
Likes
913
Then you don’t quite understand the process. He’s guaranteed $12.5 million.
Good for him! I understand the process it’s not the process rather I don’t have time, nor care, to go look up every players contract details, salary cap and all that bs! And frankly I don’t care about the NBA anymore either because of the style of the game now.
if the NBA was smart they would change the size of the court, the three-point line, and raise the goal to 12 feet!
 

VolGee4

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 11, 2012
Messages
26,100
Likes
32,471
Good for him! I understand the process it’s not the process rather I don’t have time, nor care, to go look up every players contract details, salary cap and all that bs! And frankly I don’t care about the NBA anymore either because of the style of the game now.
if the NBA was smart they would change the size of the court, the three-point line, and raise the goal to 12 feet!
Then you don’t have all of the information to say “most one and doners don’t realize they are better off staying in college.” It just takes some quick research. He was advised correctly. Kind of strange providing an opinion when you admit not having all of the info.
 

beachvol23

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 5, 2008
Messages
904
Likes
913
Then you don’t have all of the information to say “most one and doners don’t realize they are better off staying in college.” It just takes some quick research. He was advised correctly. Kind of strange providing an opinion when you admit not having all of the info.
It’s not about a single person, it’s about education if a person doesn’t know what to do with 12 1/2 or 50 million dollars, then what? The kids have the opportunity to go to college get a great education play basketball improve their overall life and game so when they get to play pro ball they are ready for it mentally and physically! As one of the other posters mentioned many of the one in dones sit on the bench or end up in the D league….mostly because they have not developed well-rounded skills at their age, because they bypassed a full college experience. Would you rather have 12 1/2 million dollars at 19 and no college degree or go to college four years, get drafted higher, and make $50-$100 million? For a smart person it’s an easy decision!
 

VolGee4

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 11, 2012
Messages
26,100
Likes
32,471
It’s not about a single person, it’s about education if a person doesn’t know what to do with 12 1/2 or 50 million dollars, then what? The kids have the opportunity to go to college get a great education play basketball improve their overall life and game so when they get to play pro ball they are ready for it mentally and physically! As one of the other posters mentioned many of the one in dones sit on the bench or end up in the D league….mostly because they have not developed well-rounded skills at their age, because they bypassed a full college experience. Would you rather have 12 1/2 million dollars at 19 and no college degree or go to college four years, get drafted higher, and make $50-$100 million? For a smart person it’s an easy decision!
If you think the degree and $50-$100 million is automatic, then there isn’t much else to discuss. Kids can get hurt, not develop as much further in college, make bad decisions, etc. $12.5 million for poor or even middle class kids is generational money, and they will make even more EVEN IF they don’t make it in the NBA. They will make 6 figures overseas.

This is coming from someone who values education, too- I have a college degree and a law degree. But Keon’s decision was pretty much a no-brainer.
 

cncchris33

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 14, 2009
Messages
27,833
Likes
29,938
It’s not about a single person, it’s about education if a person doesn’t know what to do with 12 1/2 or 50 million dollars, then what? The kids have the opportunity to go to college get a great education play basketball improve their overall life and game so when they get to play pro ball they are ready for it mentally and physically! As one of the other posters mentioned many of the one in dones sit on the bench or end up in the D league….mostly because they have not developed well-rounded skills at their age, because they bypassed a full college experience. Would you rather have 12 1/2 million dollars at 19 and no college degree or go to college four years, get drafted higher, and make $50-$100 million? For a smart person it’s an easy decision!
First, if someone guaranteed you $12.5 million as a 19 year old kid to leave college, don't pretend to tell me you wouldn't jump on it like a dog in heat.

Second, you aren't considering endorsement deals which push that total even higher.

Third, sticking around in college for four years is not a historical advantage to getting drafted higher. NBA teams value youth, upside, potential, and their unabated access to you to develop that potential. Four years later, you are older, harder to break of bad habits, and less malleable. Generally speaking, that is a less attractive profile to an NBA team unless you are someone who came in to college as a relative unknown, and developed into an NBA talent in your four years.

Fourth, the NBA rookie pay structure is no different for a college grad and a one-and-done player, so simply put, by waiting until graduation to declare for the NBA, you've cost yourself three years of earning potential. Keon, at his draft slot, was going to make $12.5 million whether he left now, or waited until he graduated in three years, not the arbitrary $50-$100 million figure you threw out there.

Fifth, so you're probably asking yourself, "Well, what if he improved in college and improved his draft stock?" I'd immediately tell you to see points 3 and 4, above, but let's take it further. What if he gets injured? Draft stock down. What if he gets exposed as just not being an elite talent? Draft stock down. What if he makes a dumb mistake and gets kicked out of school? Draft stock down.

Keon escaped all of those potential pitfalls by jumping early and getting paid. College isn't going anywhere. It will always be available to him. Most of our chosen career paths value experience, education, and development. His chosen profession values just the opposite; youth, availability, and opportunity to develop. You just can't draw a line of correlation between the two and try to make sense of it because they value entirely different key principles.
 

chuckiepoo

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 1, 2020
Messages
6,945
Likes
12,659
The question is, can one develop faster playing everyday at a major college (practice and games) or by practicing in the NBA, getting a few minutes in games--and I guess also summer league. I don't think NBA teams practice that much--given the grind of a long season, with games every 2/3 days. It's a moot point, really, as anybody who's going to be drafted in the 1st round--and probably the 2nd round as well--is going to take the money, and the should. You could return to college, blow out your knee or suffer another injury and see the financial windfall you turned down go poof!

That said, this NBA habit of drafting guys on their future potential seems mostly stupid, as a very large percentage of 1 and Done's never develop sufficiently to become a regular NBA starter. The league is full of them--and most spend most of their time riding the pine. And that's fine, too--if you are doing enough to stay in the league, as even players at the end of the bench are often making a few million. They also get traded a lot.

On another note, nice to see Grant Williams and Josh Richardson each having a pretty solid season thus far with the Celtics. Both are reserves for the Celtics, but get extensive minutes. Indeed, they are Boston's two most valuable reserves, I believe. Grant lost a lot of weight and has become a solid 3-point shooter. Richardson--after a pretty terrible year in Dallas--does a little bit of everything for the Celtics, and is shooting better than he has since he was in Miami. There have been reports that the Celtics have been exploring ways to trade him and the team's backup point guard--but most Boston fans think the team should hold onto Richardson, partly because he's making (only) roughly $10 million, I believe, and that is considered good value. I hope they do hold onto him: Another trade would make him another NBA journeyman. Nobody likes being traded every year.
For 10 large? Sign me up…
 
Likes: walkenvol

chuckiepoo

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 1, 2020
Messages
6,945
Likes
12,659
Good for him! I understand the process it’s not the process rather I don’t have time, nor care, to go look up every players contract details, salary cap and all that bs! And frankly I don’t care about the NBA anymore either because of the style of the game now.
if the NBA was smart they would change the size of the court, the three-point line, and raise the goal to 12 feet!
Talk about moving the goal posts! :cool:
 
Joined
Jan 4, 2011
Messages
956
Likes
1,393
I don’t know many college grads that would state they are specifically better at managing their money than a non-college grad. In fact, most of the ones I know are in their 30s still paying off student loans. Not sure college = financial literacy. That comes from how your family and friends manage their lifestyles more than anything else cause they definitely don’t teach it in high school.
 

Volprofch05

Educating and celebrating the Vols
Joined
Jun 9, 2021
Messages
2,975
Likes
9,205
Chandler at #28 in latest athletic mock:

2022 NBA Mock Draft 5.0: Chet Holmgren at No. 1; AJ Griffin in top 5; questions abound with this year's class

28. Memphis Grizzlies
Kennedy Chandler | 6-0 guard | 19 years old | Tennessee

I don’t quite have this grade on Kennedy Chandler, but he does have some real tools scouts are intrigued by. His speed is a genuinely awesome skill. He can attack and get into the paint at a high level. I also really love his defensive ability at the point of attack. He fights. The problem is that I don’t think he has great feel out of ball screens in terms of changing speeds, and he can’t shoot. We’ve seen this story before with a better player last year in Sharife Cooper, who ended up going in the 40s on draft night. It’s just exceptionally difficult to be a 6-foot, 170-pound guard in the NBA because of the size and length of the players involved, especially when you struggle with the finished product. On top of that, Chandler has had turnover issues at times this season. You can be as tough as you want defensively, and you’re still going to struggle with switch scenarios and the mismatches the NBA presents. He could stand to return to school and keep working through becoming an expert in ball-screen reads. But much like many freshmen in this class, he’s in that tough 25-to-50 zone.


I wasn't aware that KC can't shoot....
 
Likes: wwilso29

VN Store




Top