Ansley and staff met with The Chief

#4

IndianaVol

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#4
He's in a rare spot in his career for sure. Will have the opportunity to coach again if he wants, but has enough and done enough that he can be very, very selective where and how he coaches (I could see him being one of those rare coordinators that doesn't really do any on the road recruiting).

Also, is it just me or does Chief look like he could throw on a whistle and give the squad way more than they ever asked for in a practice right now...at 63 dude still looks like he could bite nails in two.
 
#7

Freak

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#7
He will have the opportunity to coach again if he wants it, he's made enough money that he doesn't have to though.
I think he could coach again if he wanted to. But you're right, he made good money late in his career. If I'm not mistaken, he was the highest paid assistant on the Arkansas staff last year.
 
#14

05_never_again

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#14
Did he EVER fix "3rd and Chavis"??!!
3rd and Chavis was the least of his problems once he left Tennessee.

I like Chavis; he was here a long time and did a ton for the football program, but my critique of him is that his defenses were often less than the sum of their parts. He needed elite (not just good, but elite) talent in order to have a good defense, and he didn't do a lot himself in order to bring in the elite talent (he never was known as a great recruiter).

When his talent was elite, the defense was really good. If his talent was merely "good," his defenses would struggle.
 
#15

MontyPython

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#15
In before "3rd and Cha".........nevermind.....I cannot do that. I loved Chavis.


Why is running w/ a banana? You'll put your eye out kid!

Respect him greatly. But as a fan his "bend but don't break" was frustrating. I remember him opening the NC game by having our DL shift at the last second while the QB was audibling. This was apparently a novel concept back in the day. Barely allowed FL State to score at all.

Hail to The Chief!
 
#16
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#16
3rd and Chavis was the least of his problems once he left Tennessee.

I like Chavis; he was here a long time and did a ton for the football program, but my critique of him is that his defenses were often less than the sum of their parts. He needed elite (not just good, but elite) talent in order to have a good defense, and he didn't do a lot himself in order to bring in the elite talent (he never was known as a great recruiter).

When his talent was elite, the defense was really good. If his talent was merely "good," his defenses would struggle.
Isn’t that the case for 99.9% of coaches?

I will say there were rebuilding years where the defense would struggle early but always seemed to figure it out and get better by mid season. Following years were always better too.

Spurrier had him figured out though.
 
#17

05_never_again

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#17
Isn’t that the case for 99.9% of coaches?

I will say there were rebuilding years where the defense would struggle early but always seemed to figure it out and get better by mid season. Following years were always better too.

Spurrier had him figured out though.
Not to the same degree that Chavis is, no.

IMO, Chavis's defenses only excelled when he had exceptional (not just very good, but exceptional) talent on the field, particularly at CB and LB. If your defense is always going to be less than the sum of its parts, which I think Chavis's defenses were, then by definition you need incredible parts in order for the sum to be high. If your parts are simply good, or just pretty good, but you're less than the sum of your parts, then your defense is going to be just OK.

I've always thought that one characteristic all great coaches have is that they get at least a little more out of their teams than what their ability on paper would indicate. Even coaches that always have elite talent, like Saban, do this. Having incredible talent as consistently as Saban does doesn't necessarily mean he should be winning a national title every other year, but that's on average what he's done at Alabama. He takes awesome, national title-level talent and wins with it even more consistently than it seems like he "should."

I never really thought Chavis (or Fulmer, for that matter) did that.
 
#18

McDad

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#18
In before "3rd and Cha".........nevermind.....I cannot do that. I loved Chavis.


That is a glorious fro!!!! And check the stache and sideburns!

There is so much raw masculinity contained in this pic my wife got pregnant just from a quick glance.
 
#25

GAVol

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#25
There towards the end of Fulmer era, it felt like all we had were good defenses and no offensive support at all. Felt like we averaged 14-17points on offense. May be misremembering though
You’re exactly right. Both of those bad teams at the end of Fulmer’s tenure had terrible offenses but good defenses; especially 2005.
 

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