Anonymous SEC Coaches Article

#56

SayUWantAreVOLution

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#56
So they’re saying “If your QB is good, it really helps your offense”

Ground breaking. Someone finally cracked the code.
Heupel's system depends heavily on QB reads being fast and accurate. We saw what happened with Milton in the first few games and the difference Hooker made. There's truth that the Vols and Heupel demand a lot from the QB.

My biggest fear in this season is an injury to Hooker. I was a big Milton supporter but he struggled big-time with executing the offense. Jackson is unlikely to be SEC ready.

In truth, a whole lot of the season rests on Hendon Hooker.
 
#57

J C Higgins

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#57
Heupel's system depends heavily on QB reads being fast and accurate. We saw what happened with Milton in the first few games and the difference Hooker made. There's truth that the Vols and Heupel demand a lot from the QB.

My biggest fear in this season is an injury to Hooker. I was a big Milton supporter but he struggled big-time with executing the offense. Jackson is unlikely to be SEC ready.

In truth, a whole lot of the season rests on Hendon Hooker.
Yes, the QB in Heupel's system must be able to make fast reads but that doesn't exclude freshmen from being able to do it. Chip Kelly's system which wasn't too dissimilar to Heupel's said Mariota understood what the were doing and could make proper reads two weeks after arriving at Oregon.
 
#58

SayUWantAreVOLution

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#58
Yes, the QB in Heupel's system must be able to make fast reads but that doesn't exclude freshmen from being able to do it. Chip Kelly's system which wasn't too dissimilar to Heupel's said Mariota understood what the were doing and could make proper reads two weeks after arriving at Oregon.
As I said, I believe in Hendon Hooker but I'm definitely unsure of Milton's ability to execute the offense and I'd rather not hope Jackson is Heisman material like Mariota was.

Somehow expecting any QB can handle these quick reads because Mariota did it strikes me as saying any QB should be able to engineer a quick comeback because Brady and Rodgers do it.
 
#59

J C Higgins

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#59
As I said, I believe in Hendon Hooker but I'm definitely unsure of Milton's ability to execute the offense and I'd rather not hope Jackson is Heisman material like Mariota was.

Somehow expecting any QB can handle these quick reads because Mariota did it strikes me as saying any QB should be able to engineer a quick comeback because Brady and Rodgers do it.
Didn't say I expected anything. Just said some can grasp a system rapidly and make proper reads in a short time and some never do.
 
#60

TheDeeble

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#60
I don't remember, but how well did the offense perform when opposing defenses started flopping? I know the offense works great when they can run at their pace, but how much disruption did it cause to stop for an injury every other play?

That might be what that opposing coach is referencing when he said the offense is pretty easy to break down.
 
#61

VFL-82-JP

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#61
I don't remember, but how well did the offense perform when opposing defenses started flopping? I know the offense works great when they can run at their pace, but how much disruption did it cause to stop for an injury every other play?

That might be what that opposing coach is referencing when he said the offense is pretty easy to break down.
The offense will work at any pace. There are reads for the QB and WRs to make whether we're going fast or slow, and match-ups we're looking for.

First and foremost, our offense is a spread offense. Get the wide-outs way out there, beyond the numbers, so we can isolate just 5 or 6 defenders in the box. That enables a potent run game. And surprisingly, Heupel's offense is built just as much on the run as the pass.

Second, the offense is about mis-matches and receiver options in their patterns. Each "on" receiver (some are off on a given play) may have three or four different routes he can choose to run, based on how the defense covers him. The QB knows about each receiver's options, and is looking to see which way he goes. The QB can actually often anticipate the receiver's choice, because he too can see how the defense is lining up to defend.

Only after those two basic elements of the offense are taken into account does speed come into play. It makes both those two aspects work even better, when we can catch a defender out of position or with his back turned to the play as we snap it.

But the offense doesn't require speed. It requires those first two elements more.

Go Vols!
 
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#62

TheDeeble

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#62
The offense will work at any pace. There are reads for the QB to make whether we're going fast or slow, and there can be match-ups we're looking for, too.

It's just easier for the defense to make a mistake if we're not giving their coaching staff so much time to survey our formation and yell in adjustments to their lads. Easier to catch them on their heels, too. But the offense isn't dependent upon speed, per se.
Ok. I wasn't sure where Heupel's offense falls on the scale from "very potent under any circumstance" to "moves the ball mostly because they line up quickly and take away chances for the defense to adjust".
 
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#63

knox-townVOL

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#63
The offense will work at any pace. There are reads for the QB and WRs to make whether we're going fast or slow, and match-ups we're looking for.

First and foremost, our offense is a spread offense. Get the wide-outs way out there, beyond the numbers, so we can isolate just 5 or 6 defenders in the box. That enables a potent run game. And surprisingly, Heupel's offense is built just as much on the run as the pass.

Second, the offense is about mis-matches and receiver options in their patterns. Each "on" receiver (some are off on a given play) may have three or four different routes he can choose to run, based on how the defense covers him. The QB knows about each receiver's options, and is looking to see which way he goes. The QB can actually often anticipate the receiver's choice, because he too can see how the defense is lining up to defend.

Only after those two basic elements of the offense are taken into account does speed come into play. It makes both those two aspects work even better, when we can catch a defender out of position or with his back turned to the play as we snap it.

But the offense doesn't require speed. It requires those first two elements more.

Go Vols!
I saw a film breakdown on this actually. You’re right, it’s crazy how far out wide Heup lines his receivers. Dudes practically have 1 foot out of bounds.
 
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#65

OrangeTsar

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#65
I did, but this part pissed me off, so I quoted it. Regardless, I'm excited to see the next stage of the offense and shut down those that call it a "gimmick" offense. GBO
Call it a gimmick or not, the practical point is that the speed and pace gives the defense precious little time to respond. The simplest pass route in the world is effective if the correct defender doesn’t pick up his assignment because of the offensive cadence. No defensive set can defend every possible play and as long as Heup has enough effective plays and players that can execute, the defense will always have to make a split second decision on how to respond. And a decisive QB with fast process speed will always make them pay
And that’s the ball game folks
 
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#66

VOLINVONORE

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#66
The offense will work at any pace. There are reads for the QB and WRs to make whether we're going fast or slow, and match-ups we're looking for.

First and foremost, our offense is a spread offense. Get the wide-outs way out there, beyond the numbers, so we can isolate just 5 or 6 defenders in the box. That enables a potent run game. And surprisingly, Heupel's offense is built just as much on the run as the pass.

Second, the offense is about mis-matches and receiver options in their patterns. Each "on" receiver (some are off on a given play) may have three or four different routes he can choose to run, based on how the defense covers him. The QB knows about each receiver's options, and is looking to see which way he goes. The QB can actually often anticipate the receiver's choice, because he too can see how the defense is lining up to defend.

Only after those two basic elements of the offense are taken into account does speed come into play. It makes both those two aspects work even better, when we can catch a defender out of position or with his back turned to the play as we snap it.

But the offense doesn't require speed. It requires those first two elements more.

Go Vols!
One gets more mismatches with quickly getting to play snapped. Many times, the defensive backs are out of position when the play is snapped and a long TD results. Speed is an important need for the system to work as designed.
 
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#68

VFL-82-JP

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#68
One gets more mismatches with quickly getting to play snapped. Many times, the defensive backs are out of position when the play is snapped and a long TD results. Speed is an important need for the system to work as designed.
Whistle-to-snap speed is not intrinsic to the offensive scheme, just an additional wrinkle that can be VERY effective.
 

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