5G Performance

#1

Wireless1

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#1
Watching the T Mobile commercial with a dad and son fishing a question came to kind.
I thought the range of 5G was only about 1500’ unobstructed from a transmitter/receiver. How can 5G work on a lake, are they going to ring the lake with transmitters? I get the benefits of 5G in Newland and high density populations but what’s the advantage in suburbia and rural areas?
 
#5

MetVol

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#5
Watching the T Mobile commercial with a dad and son fishing a question came to kind.
I thought the range of 5G was only about 1500’ unobstructed from a transmitter/receiver. How can 5G work on a lake, are they going to ring the lake with transmitters? I get the benefits of 5G in Newland and high density populations but what’s the advantage in suburbia and rural areas?
The way I've understood it is that "real" 5G will be very limited to primarily urban areas because of the high frequencies/low wavelengths that can't travel far distances and face issues with blockage by buildings, walls, and such. That's mmWave 5G.

The other "5G" is really just a slightly improved 4G network that uses sub-6 GHz frequencies. It does improve speeds slightly and travels better, so it's often called mid-range/mid-band 5G by wireless networks. I think best case it's supposed to be about 3 times faster than existing 4G. Most 5G that you'll see across the country at this point is the mid-band 5G. I know T-Mobile has rolled out the most at this point within the mid-band range, but ATT and Verizon are supposed to be activating a large chunk of mid-band 5G later this month across the country which will be a major upgrade for those networks.

Found this link that goes into more details if you're interested: Sub-6 vs. mmWave 5G Networks: What's the Difference? | Digital Trends
 
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#6

Wireless1

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#6
The way I've understood it is that "real" 5G will be very limited to primarily urban areas because of the high frequencies/low wavelengths that can't travel far distances and face issues with blockage by buildings, walls, and such. That's mmWave 5G.

The other "5G" is really just a slightly improved 4G network that uses sub-6 GHz frequencies. It does improve speeds slightly and travels better, so it's often called mid-range/mid-band 5G by wireless networks. I think best case it's supposed to be about 3 times faster than existing 4G. Most 5G that you'll see across the country at this point is the mid-band 5G. I know T-Mobile has rolled out the most at this point within the mid-band range, but ATT and Verizon are supposed to be activating a large chunk of mid-band 5G later this month across the country which will be a major upgrade for those networks.

Found this link that goes into more details if you're interested: Sub-6 vs. mmWave 5G Networks: What's the Difference? | Digital Trends
Thanks, it sounds like 5G is really 2 technologies, one that’s “enhanced” 4G and another that’s amazing but so limited it’s rarely practical
 
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#7

3rdDegreeVol

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Thanks, it sounds like 5G is really 2 technologies, one that’s “enhanced” 4G and another that’s amazing but so limited it’s rarely practical
Former cellular network engineer here. 5G is a single network using a spec called NR or New Radio which is an extension of LTE. How fast it is depends on the frequency in use. At the same frequencies 4G uses, it's about 10-15% faster than 4G. However 5G supports higher frequencies than 4G, all the way up to millimeter wave. At those frequencies there's a whole lot more bandwidth and shorter wavelengths which allow for much higher speeds. The trade off is that the higher the frequency the less it propagates and the worse it penetrates buildings.
 
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