2021 things

#1

Nocleats

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#1
What will Spring Practice look like with Covid Protocol in place? Will it be like fall camp last year where entire positions are quarantined for 2 weeks? Will teams be able to stretch practice time out if that happens or will it just be missed practices?
How about summer, will they be allowed on campus this summer or more of the same?
And how about during the season?
How many fans will be allowed in Neyland? How about Quarantine contact tracing??
All things to be figured out maybe?
 
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#3
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#3
The Chancellor has already said that the Fall semester will return to the traditional format of in class teaching and attendance so I would think that would bode well for fan attendance at the games in the fall. As for Spring practice, I would imagine that Covid protocols from the past season will remain in place and yes, that will include contact tracing.
 
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#11

DeerPark12

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#11
@DeerPark12, do you have any insights on how they're gonna handle Spring practice?
Practice will be normal. SEC Covid protocols won't allow any non-school personnel inside athleic facilities at this time, so no media, boosters, scouts, VFLs, etc., just like it was in the fall.

UT is debating the spring game. I still think it is very unlikely, but there are some external pressures to have one, including a couple of sponsorship packages that hinge on it happening. We'll see. They may announce a tentative spring game date, with the ability to call it off later.
 
#12

DeerPark12

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#12
The Chancellor has already said that the Fall semester will return to the traditional format of in class teaching and attendance so I would think that would bode well for fan attendance at the games in the fall. As for Spring practice, I would imagine that Covid protocols from the past season will remain in place and yes, that will include contact tracing.
Fans in Neyland will be determined by local and state regulations. UT has to abide by whatever the city, county and state decide on public venue capacity, which is currently capped at 25%. UT is hoping for at least 50%.
 
#14

savannahfan

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#14
What will Spring Practice look like with Covid Protocol in place? Will it be like fall camp last year where entire positions are quarantined for 2 weeks? Will teams be able to stretch practice time out if that happens or will it just be missed practices?
How about summer, will they be allowed on campus this summer or more of the same?
And how about during the season?
How many fans will be allowed in Neyland? How about Quarantine contact tracing??
All things to be figured out maybe?
Don't you expect that all players and staff will be vaccinated by then. If so, will they not be able to carry on as normal? If the "shot" does not allow normalcy then why take the dam- things? I am/have taken it, but if they now are saying don't change what you have been doing, then why the hell trouble oneself with it?
 
#15

temptn

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#15
I think that it will be fine by Fall. Supposed to have everyone vaccinated by August.

One month ago, the CDC published the results of more than 20 pandemic forecasting models. Most projected that COVID-19 cases would continue to grow through February, or at least plateau. Instead, COVID-19 is in retreat in America. New daily cases have plunged, and hospitalizations are down almost 50 percent in the past month. This is not an artifact of infrequent testing, since the share of regional daily tests that are coming back positive has declined even more than the number of cases. Some pandemic statistics are foggy, but the current decline of COVID-19 is crystal clear.

Biden said "the country has secured enough doses from Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech to have vaccines for every American by the end of July. "

.
 
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#16

37620VOL

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#16
Don't you expect that all players and staff will be vaccinated by then. If so, will they not be able to carry on as normal? If the "shot" does not allow normalcy then why take the dam- things? I am/have taken it, but if they now are saying don't change what you have been doing, then why the hell trouble oneself with it?
I think they still want everyone wearing masks because not even 20% of the US is vaccinated. If you tell those 15-20% they no longer have to wear masks, then a large number of the unvaccinated may do so as well. IMO once the vaccine has been offered to everyone, the masks are gone, except to contain localized outbreaks. If I had to guess, things will be fairly normal by end of June, maybe earlier.
 
#17

VFL-82-JP

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#17
I think that it will be fine by Fall. Supposed to have everyone vaccinated by August.

One month ago, the CDC published the results of more than 20 pandemic forecasting models. Most projected that COVID-19 cases would continue to grow through February, or at least plateau. Instead, COVID-19 is in retreat in America. New daily cases have plunged, and hospitalizations are down almost 50 percent in the past month. This is not an artifact of infrequent testing, since the share of regional daily tests that are coming back positive has declined even more than the number of cases. Some pandemic statistics are foggy, but the current decline of COVID-19 is crystal clear.

Biden said "the country has secured enough doses from Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech to have vaccines for every American by the end of July. "

.
Matches up well with what I shared yesterday from another source (Johns Hopkins professor, new covid cases down a whopping 77% from two months ago, good chance we'll see herd immunity by April). We might have this puppy under control (not gone, but under control) much quicker than all previous estimates indicated.

The scientific community are slow to laud the sudden progress because they worry folks will decide they don't need to get the vaccine if they hear good news like this. Medical and political leaders will try not to acknowledge it as long as they can, because they don't want anything slowing down the push to get us widely vaccinated.

I'm all for broad vaccination (already got my first shot, in fact), but I think the American people can handle the truth. Truth is, things are taking a sudden and dramatic turn for the better. Thank our T-cells, apparently, for an anti-gen immunity that even antibody tests can't see.

We'll be playing in a full Neyland this September!

Go Vols!
 
#18

robow

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#18
What will Spring Practice look like with Covid Protocol in place? Will it be like fall camp last year where entire positions are quarantined for 2 weeks? Will teams be able to stretch practice time out if that happens or will it just be missed practices?
How about summer, will they be allowed on campus this summer or more of the same?
And how about during the season?
How many fans will be allowed in Neyland? How about Quarantine contact tracing??
All things to be figured out maybe?
As my kids would say: are we there yet,.. are we there yet... are we there yet?
 
#19

SN-A-C Orange

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#19
I think that it will be fine by Fall. Supposed to have everyone vaccinated by August.

One month ago, the CDC published the results of more than 20 pandemic forecasting models. Most projected that COVID-19 cases would continue to grow through February, or at least plateau. Instead, COVID-19 is in retreat in America. New daily cases have plunged, and hospitalizations are down almost 50 percent in the past month. This is not an artifact of infrequent testing, since the share of regional daily tests that are coming back positive has declined even more than the number of cases. Some pandemic statistics are foggy, but the current decline of COVID-19 is crystal clear. ... to have vaccines for every American by the end of July. "
Overly optimistic assessment.
Here is what we need to remember ... 'vaccine' (which it is not) - is not protection nor is it a guarantee. [Note: Our church family has lots of doctors as members, and our access to the medical community is extensive. We are trying to be very, very careful. Yes, we are aware of the differing stands being touted. We are primarily concerned with the health and wellbeing of our members. So, we have opted for a 'more' careful approach.]

3 weeks after vaccination:
'We're going to see more': Man tests positive for COVID-19 after getting vaccine dose [Feb 9th]
Can you still transmit Covid-19 after vaccination? [Feb 3rd]
Vaccinated people can still get infected with Covid-19. Here's why - CNN [dated but excellent info Jan 8th]
  1. You can still get covid (albeit those who 'vaccinated' do appear to have a lessened bout)!
  2. The 'word of mouth' research is leaning toward you can be a carrier and spread it - even if you have had both shots. Accurate clinical research is still pending.
  3. The variants are still problematic. The current shots may or may not be effective as covid migrates strains (flu shots are only good against some flu types).
  4. No one knows how long the shot immunity lasts, we are taking this emergency approach to get the outbreak under control.
  5. There are reasons why those who have the shots should feel more confident, but still wear masks.
If you have pertinent info on this topic, feel free to share. We continue to research and garner new info on this topic almost daily.
 
#20
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#20
I think that it will be fine by Fall. Supposed to have everyone vaccinated by August.

One month ago, the CDC published the results of more than 20 pandemic forecasting models. Most projected that COVID-19 cases would continue to grow through February, or at least plateau. Instead, COVID-19 is in retreat in America. New daily cases have plunged, and hospitalizations are down almost 50 percent in the past month. This is not an artifact of infrequent testing, since the share of regional daily tests that are coming back positive has declined even more than the number of cases. Some pandemic statistics are foggy, but the current decline of COVID-19 is crystal clear.

Biden said "the country has secured enough doses from Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech to have vaccines for every American by the end of July. "

.
It's not just in retreat in America, but everywhere in the world right now.
 
#21

sjt18

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#21
Overly optimistic assessment.

  1. The 'word of mouth' research is leaning toward you can be a carrier and spread it - even if you have had both shots. Accurate clinical research is still pending
Maybe you are my guy. I've been asking for MONTHS.

What is "word of mouth" research? Would that be acceptance of anecdotal evidence in favor of a pre-conclusion?

Do you have a peer reviewed study with a significant data set demonstrating that non-symptomatic much less asymptomatic people spread Covid? That claim was made over a year ago. Studies were commissioned to study it. I have yet to see any study proving that people without symptoms spread the virus at all... much less to what degree compared to those with symptoms. The last part is the most critical. On very rare occasions, people infected with the flu can spread the virus while not manifesting symptoms. But we don't create rules to cover the statistically small anomaly.

A WHO rep was bullied after she said it... but their review of contact traces around the world did not identify cases of asymptomatic transmission. Her "retraction" was simply that her conclusion was not a statement concerning pre-symptomatic patients. But she didn't say they transmitted the virus commonly either.
[*]There are reasons why those who have the shots should feel more confident, but still wear masks.
I am not aware of any evidence that masks are anything more than a placebo. Areas with heavy mask usage have been just as subject to spread, spikes, hospitalizations, and deaths as areas without mask use. The data does not suggest that areas that have spikes in spread have benefited when more people start wearing masks.

I had Covid in February. All four of us in our home caught it from my daughter. She works in a nursing home that sanitizes surfaces daily and has strict mask wearing policies. They've had multiple instances of spread in a fairly small nursing home.

My workplace installed bipolar ionization air filtration when Covid first began to spread in the US. We do NOT have a strict mask policy. Essentially we only wear them as required by the corporate office following return from contact quarantine. We have people working in constant close contact. We have had infected people in those areas. We have NOT had a single transmission in our facility.

There are solutions that work that could have been deployed and save a lot of illness and death.... and then there are things our "experts" have offered that appear to have no value other than to convince the public that they are "doing something".
If you have pertinent info on this topic, feel free to share. We continue to research and garner new info on this topic almost daily.
I hope you have the info I've been looking for.... honestly I've hardened on some of these things precisely because people responding defensively as if it were unreasonable for me to expect proof for these solutions.
 
#22
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#22
Practice will be normal. SEC Covid protocols won't allow any non-school personnel inside athleic facilities at this time, so no media, boosters, scouts, VFLs, etc., just like it was in the fall.

UT is debating the spring game. I still think it is very unlikely, but there are some external pressures to have one, including a couple of sponsorship packages that hinge on it happening. We'll see. They may announce a tentative spring game date, with the ability to call it off later.
I don't understand why a spring game isn't considered possible. If the powers that be were fine with limited attendance during the season, what's wrong with the same limited attendance for a "one off" spring practice game?
 
#23

SaintLouieVol

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#23
Overly optimistic assessment.
Here is what we need to remember ... 'vaccine' (which it is not) - is not protection nor is it a guarantee. [Note: Our church family has lots of doctors as members, and our access to the medical community is extensive. We are trying to be very, very careful. Yes, we are aware of the differing stands being touted. We are primarily concerned with the health and wellbeing of our members. So, we have opted for a 'more' careful approach.]

3 weeks after vaccination:
'We're going to see more': Man tests positive for COVID-19 after getting vaccine dose [Feb 9th]
Can you still transmit Covid-19 after vaccination? [Feb 3rd]
Vaccinated people can still get infected with Covid-19. Here's why - CNN [dated but excellent info Jan 8th]
  1. You can still get covid (albeit those who 'vaccinated' do appear to have a lessened bout)!
  2. The 'word of mouth' research is leaning toward you can be a carrier and spread it - even if you have had both shots. Accurate clinical research is still pending.
  3. The variants are still problematic. The current shots may or may not be effective as covid migrates strains (flu shots are only good against some flu types).
  4. No one knows how long the shot immunity lasts, we are taking this emergency approach to get the outbreak under control.
  5. There are reasons why those who have the shots should feel more confident, but still wear masks.
If you have pertinent info on this topic, feel free to share. We continue to research and garner new info on this topic almost daily.
All your points are good ones. None of this should surprise anyone. It would help if the general public including the news media had a rudimentary understanding of science/immunology but that is not where we are. The math is fairly simple. A vaccine that is 95% effective simply means that a non-vaccinated individual is 20 times more likely to get covid than a vaccinated person. It does not mean that you are bullet proof once vaccinated. Data on how long immunity lasts is currently being collected but it is too early to speculate on what the data will show. Also there will definitely be person to person variability in length of immunity. The effectiveness of approved vaccines against the three known varients (there will be more than three!) is also already being evaluated but too early for an answer to this question. Bottom line is: 1) We will all be much better off once the majority of our population is vaccinated; 2) Those who choose to not get the vaccine will always be at a higher risk of contracting Covid; 3) Those who continue to wear masks and take other precautions will also reduce their risk; 4) the biggest factor in how quickly our population is vaccinated is how the distribution channels are handled by the governing bodies in each state (this should worry us all!) 5) Covid is NOT going away, the goal is to reduce its impact below pandemic status. It is unlikely that we will be back to "normal" (or the new normal) in 2021. Sometime in 2022 is a more realistic expectation. One last point. Considerable new research into anti-virals effective against covid is underway. These are not meant to prevent contracting the virus but to minimize the impact to those who are infected. Once available it will be a combination of these new drugs PLUS continued vaccination that will lead us to a better place (full stadiums, meals at restaurants, etc.). Obviously, what everyone wants is a "quick fix" but that is an unrealistic expectation.
 
#24

DeerPark12

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#24
I don't understand why a spring game isn't considered possible. If the powers that be were fine with limited attendance during the season, what's wrong with the same limited attendance for a "one off" spring practice game?
Two factors at play: economics and resources.

On the economic side, UT's cost on the reduced crowd was high because of the extra safety measures that were required by local authorities. They needed about 15,000 paying fans to break even on each game this fall, and that was paying full ticket prices. Also, they would be capped at the same ~20k that they had for the regular season. So they would have to do some kind of ticketing for the event, even if it was only $5 or so to offset costs, but mostly to make sure that people stayed distanced. Any attendance at the spring game would be a pretty substantial money loser. In a normal year, schools will take that hit for the goodwill and publicity that it provides. In this year, it's a tough sell to administrators.

On the resource side, you have to remember that a lot of the things used in the stadium in the fall (ticket scanners, hand sanitizer stations, barriers for concessions, etc. make their way to UT's other venues when football is over. With the usual spring sports competing at baseball, softball and tennis as well as volleyball and soccer having full spring seasons , those things are already spread pretty thin.

For a normal spring game, they get 25-35,000 and use less than half of the normal entrances and have most of the upper deck closed off. To welcome a crowd of 20,000 in COVID times, they would have to open and staff all of the gates as well as have staff, security and concessions open in all areas.
 
#25

temptn

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#25
In an op-ed for the Wall Street Journal on Friday, Dr. Marty Makary — a surgeon and a professor at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and Bloomberg School of Public Health — argues that there are actually many more than the 28 million confirmed cases of the coronavirus in the U.S., possibly as much as 6.5 times more than that number. Between that group, and the roughly 15 percent of the country which has already received one dose of the vaccine, Makary argues that much of the nation is already protected from the virus.

“There is reason to think the country is racing toward an extremely low level of infection,” Makary wrote. “As more people have been infected, most of whom have mild or no symptoms, there are fewer Americans left to be infected. At the current trajectory, I expect Covid will be mostly gone by April, allowing Americans to resume normal life.”


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