1965 Freshman Football Team

#76

SayUWantAreVOLution

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#76
Teams in those days rarely lifted weights. Chip Kell was the first real weightlifter I recall ever playing at Tennessee. He benched 550lbs and I don’t think Tennessee has had many if any beat that.

Listen I’m not arguing that Reggie White, probably the greatest DL in the history of the game, wouldn’t have been dominant but the cut blocks, wider splits & crackback blocks (also illegal now) would have been different. I don’t think 300 OTs could survive today under those old rules. Hell, they can’t block good people now without holding even by todays rules.
It's just a different game. Sure, traditional blocking has been replaced by hand techniques but the interior guys are so quick that old school blocking would be useless. You HAVE to get some jersey or they're on the QB.

Athletes at all positions are so quick now compared to the 60s, the rules are geared to faster athletes, and the conditioning is all science now.
 
#77

MillerTime80

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#77
When I taught at Whittle Springs Middle School, they had a school record(s) board and Bill Justus held about every record there was in multiple events related to fitness testing and PE/sports specific achievements. The old timers told me that he was one of the BEST athletes to come out of Knoxville and was just great at anything he played. That records board was like a shrine to Bill Justus.
At Whittle Springs, Justus was coached by Burrall Paye. Burrall ended up having a very successful high school coaching career and subsequently, coached a lot good players. He says Justus might be the best. Justus and my Dad went to Fulton together (quiet a few amazing athletes were there at the same time). At UT, Justus is the one that convinced my Dad to walk-on to the basketball team. And as fate would have it, about 25 years ago I ended up moving to SW Virginia and becoming friends with Burrall & his wife Nancy. To this day, he lights up when he starts talking about Billy Justus.
 
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#82

Volfan1000

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#82
this was 1965 signing class

Baker, Bill
Ball, David
Bates, Danny
Blizzard, Jimmy
Brookshire, Dave
Callaway, Richard
Chambers, Bear
Dalton, Benny
Deahl, Rich
DeLong, Kenny
Dixon, Billy
Dominic, Wyatt
Dunnaway, Bill
Ellis, Dick
Faris, Eddie
Flowers, Richmond
Gorin, Jeff
Hall, Buddy
Hampel, Ted
Harrison, Ralph
Holcombe, Bob
Holloway, Jerry
Holly, Jim
Hubbach, George
Justus, Bill
Kemp, Brantley
Kidd, Rusty
Kunsa, Dick
LaCoste, Kelly
Mangle, Ronnie
Marino, Rick
McCord, Ken
McDonald, Jim
McMeans, Neal
Merritt, JB
Page, Jim
Patterson, Wayne
Pickens, Richard
Rosenfelder, Charles
Showalter, Nick
Simler, G
Smith, K
Stewart, Clifton
Tagg, Billy
Thomas, Donny
Thomas, Jimmy
Timms, Sammy
Weatherford, Jimmy
Williams, Dick
Williams, Ferrell
Yannosey, Frank
Young, Bill

Was that the same Justus that played basketball and was a deadeye free throw shooter?
 
#83

J C Higgins

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#83
Yes. Coach Dickey is often overlooked for the outstanding job he did in the mid to late 60s. He inherited a total rebuild and turned them into championship contenders. Sometimes I am tempted to rank him as our 2nd best coach of all time behind Neyland. Fulmer had a longer tenure but I think Dickeys quick turnaround was more impressive.
I'm not just tempted to call him the second best. IMO he was second best.
 
#85

J C Higgins

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#85
couldn’t use your hands at all in those days. Just like those guys would get killed by todays rules, todays OL couldn’t block using those rules. Defenders would be by them in an instant. They changed the rules to protect QBs and promote the passing game.
The two most significant changes since I've been watching football were the two platoon rule and offensive lineman's use of hands rule.
Football started out as a "one platoon" game but became a modified two platoon game for years then in 1954 reverted to being a one platoon game for about 10 years. When the one platoon rule was instituted in 1954 General Neyland welcomed it saying two platoon football was a "chicken ****" game.
Offensive lineman weren't allowed to use their hands until some time in the 70's. I remember Bear Bryant being asked why he was retiring and he said "because I don't know how to coach holding".

The other major rule change had to do with the position of the hash marks. There were none at first but were instituted in the mid 30's at which time they were 10 yards from the sidelines. They move toward the center of the field a couple times but the most significant was in 1972. That change gave the offense a big advantage, especially for running backs.
 
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#87

Volizona

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#87
The two most significant changes since I've been watching football were the two platoon rule and offensive lineman's use of hands rule.
Football started out as a "one platoon" game but became a modified two platoon game for years then in 1954 reverted to being a one platoon game for about 10 years. When the one platoon rule was instituted in 1954 General Neyland welcomed it saying two platoon football was a "chicken ****" game.
Offensive lineman weren't allowed to use their hands until some time in the 70's. I remember Bear Bryant being asked why he was retiring and he said "because I don't know how to coach holding".
The rule changes are why you can never compare QB stats today against those of up to the late 70s. All of the new rules favor the offense. If a QB before the rule changes completed 60 % of his passes and threw for 3000 yards it was almost unheard off. Defenses could pulverize the QB in those days. Today you aren’t even allowed to look at the QB and as a result you have a bunch of sissy boys in the NFL who never get touched and live off of easy dink and dunk passes. Peyton said he once looked at his Dads stats and said they were terrible. Actually they weren’t considering the rules Archie had to play with. Sorry for the rant. Now keep off my grass.
 
#88

Orange Sunset

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#88
Nope. I-75 in Lenoir City.

Are those glasses from the 50's or 60's?
Gotcha on the I75.

Glasses have no manufacturers markings but by process of elimination they are 1960's. Georgia Tech left the SEC in 1964 & they are not listed on the glasses. Have all the glasses pictured below plus the 6 pictured above.
Give Bear a treat & a couple head rubs for me!

1642126577103.jpeg
 
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#89

Boca Vol

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#89
Gotcha on the I75.

Glasses have no manufacturers markings but by process of elimination they are 1960's. Georgia Tech left the SEC in 1964 & they are not listed on the glasses. Have all the glasses pictured below plus the 6 pictured above.
Give Bear a treat & a couple head rubs for me!

View attachment 428154
Very nice collection!!!!!!
 
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#92
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#92
The rule changes are why you can never compare QB stats today against those of up to the late 70s. All of the new rules favor the offense. If a QB before the rule changes completed 60 % of his passes and threw for 3000 yards it was almost unheard off. Defenses could pulverize the QB in those days. Today you aren’t even allowed to look at the QB and as a result you have a bunch of sissy boys in the NFL who never get touched and live off of easy dink and dunk passes. Peyton said he once looked at his Dads stats and said they were terrible. Actually they weren’t considering the rules Archie had to play with. Sorry for the rant. Now keep off my grass.
Exactly. When I played as an undersized center, we had to block with our fists close to our chest, our forearms pretty level, and our elbows out like wings. That's way I remember it. Pass blocking was rough.
 
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