‘Post-Racial’ America Starts with Two-Parent Black Families

#58

BayVol7

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#58
Some people are born on 3rd base, some 2nd base, some on 1st, some are born standing at the plate with an 0-2 count. You can’t legislate or regulate “equal opportunity“ in a free country the best you can do is set the stage for everyone to have an opportunity.
I agree with this generally but there are other problems AAs face in addition to what you stated.
 
#63

norrislakevol

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#63
Because throughout history there have always been haves and have nots, and there always will be regardless of skin color or government intervention. You cannot legislate the poor to be wealthier, and you cannot legislate the wealthier to be poor. That never has worked and never will work.
 
#65

Zues1

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#65
Anti-Woke Black Leader: ‘Post-Racial’ America Starts with Two-Parent Black Families
4
Facebook/Kendall A. Qualls
DR. SUSAN BERRY24 Nov 202112
6:43
An anti-woke black leader denounced the pervasion of racial identity in the country’s culture and urged Americans to achieve a “post-racial” state by encouraging a return to two-parent black families.
At an event sponsored in early November by the Liberty Classical Academy, Minnesota-based TakeCharge President Kendall Qualls addressed the issue of “Envisioning a Post Racial America,” and moving the nation beyond its current laser focus on racial identity.



Qualls, who speaks out regularly against Critical Race Theory, observed that on the day Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated, he was five years old, and “at that time, nearly 80 percent of black children were born in two-parent families”:
In my lifetime, we have seen the black community transformed from 80 percent two-parent families to 80 percent fatherless homes, without one national initiative to reverse the trend. If the American black family was a spotted owl or grey wolf, it would be on the endangered species list. There would be a national campaign to save the black family. There’d be galas, commercials, bumper stickers … My friends, what has happened in the black community is nothing short of a cultural genocide, and it’s the cause of 90 percent of the problems that we face in our communities. Not the mystical systemic racism. This is not the dream that Martin Luther King had in mind, and it’s been a nightmare for children. born during this time. We have been used as political pawns for 50 years and it ends tonight.​


The black leader noted to his audience that, while Americans are today “bombarded with messages, that the country is overflowing with white supremacy, systemic racism,” the truth is “we’re actually living in the least racist period in our country’s history:”
But if you listen exclusively to news media, the entertainment industry and what I like to call the academic industrial complex, you would never know the real truth. That this is the least racist period in our country’s history in one of the least racist countries in the world. So having lived through the Jim Crow South, my parents and grandparents would have loved to have grown up in the America that I grew up in.​
Qualls explained that, even within his own family of origin, a great contrast exists in the lives of his and his wife’s children and those of some of his siblings:
My children are the only ones that grew up with both a mother and a father in the home. Half their cousins have never finished high school. None have gone on to college. Half my nephews have been incarcerated. My nieces are mothers of children, having never been married. So, how do we explain these differences? Was the systemic racism built into American society? Or was it something else? Well, here you have two tales from the same family, same skin color, yet the disparities are quite broad.​
Qualls said that, while he grew up first in Harlem in New York City, and then in a trailer park in Oklahoma, where he was often called “ghetto kid” and “trailer trash,” he was motivated to get an education, which he called “the great equalizer.”
Ultimately, he began a marketing career in the healthcare industry, where, at 36 years old, he became responsible for a $94 million budget.
“Trust me, I tell people all the time, I’m no one exceptional,” Qualls told his audience. “I live in an exceptional country. And I serve an exceptional God. A story like mine can happen … only in America, but it’s happened to millions of people in this country.”


He said his experience is a stark example of how America has changed:

I know what systemic racism is. My parents and grandparents lived through systemic racism. I did not. Over the course of my life … I received help from people, personally and professionally, that didn’t look like me. I received help from people who were black and white, rich and poor, male and female, from all over the country. They helped out of the goodness of their hearts. How do I know that? Because I had nothing to give them … Americans routinely help people who are trying to better their lot in life, and they don’t put a racial filter on it.​
“If you look for racism in this country, you’ll find it,” Qualls emphasized. “But if you look for opportunity, you’ll find it 100 times over.”
He invited his audience to observe that many native-born black Americans are “blinded by the tears of anger, mistrust, and misunderstanding,” in contrast to the black Americans who have legally immigrated to the United States from the Caribbean Islands and African nations such as Nigeria.
“They earn significantly more than native born black Americans,” Qualls explained. “They achieve higher levels of education. And they are living the American Dream that civil rights leaders desired for us.”
“Many of these new citizens came to the country with intact families, which helped them with achievement and integration,” he added. “But another reason they’ve had success is they haven’t been indoctrinated by years of anti-white, anti-American, and anti-capitalist hatred.”


Qualls urged black Americans to “reconcile with the sins of our nation, re-establish two-parent families, rebuild our culture, and join other Americans around the table of prosperity as fellow citizens of this great country.”
He recommended black Americans begin this transformation by “tapping into the strength of our cultural roots of the black culture, which is linked to our Christian faith”:
Forgiveness is the cornerstone for Christianity. Just as God extends forgiveness to us in Christ, we are called to forgive others. As we take steps to forgive our country for the sins of slavery, Jim Crow laws, and many other forms of bigotry that followed, the heavy burden of bitterness, anger, resentment will be lifted from our shoulders. Our eyes will be open to clearly see the path forward, allowing us to focus on what’s best for our future, and the future of our children.​
“I want to be clear: to forgive is an act of strength, not weakness,” Qualls asserted.
“We cannot continue forth as a healthy nation, thinking we are living in two separate Americas, and pitting groups of people against each other,” he emphasized. “It is unsustainable, and it is un-American.”
“We must come together with a renewed hope in our future,” he said, “by returning to trusted foundational values that can see us through a post-racial America, foundational values and behaviors that have weathered the test of time, which include personal responsibility, strong work ethic, pride in one’s nation, faith, two-parent families, and a first-rate education that allows anyone, and yes, I do mean anyone, to achieve their dreams.”
Well imagine that. ;)
 
#66

landscapingvol

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#66
I realize almost every thread I touch becomes incendiary because I have a different perspective than the majority of you and I am sure this one will be no different. But I find articles such as these incredibly disingenuous to the issues many AAs face.
White single households have increased as well but the wealth gap has not decreased. Does more support help a child be successful? Absolutely! Many of us also come from broken homes with both parents which did us no favors. My point is the issue isn’t as simple as this interesting fella describes.


Unfortunately, those who like to solely blame AAs for their place in this country will misinterpret the above. There are many reasons for this “trend.”

This statement goes against the below statement. And really the entire article. MLK references such as these should be outlawed.

Least racial does not equal “post racial.”

This is very disingenuous. He paints the picture as if there is one sole reason for failure and success.

I’d love to hear what he thinks systemic racism is. Was a switch flipped in the past 20 years that the rest of the AAs missed?

He just described one of many components of systematic racism 🤷‍♂️

Why does he think there is hatred? Mistrust? Fear? Couldn‘t have appeared out of thin air.

Most AAs want equality. But it will take substantial help or several generations to achieve that goal.
With all do respect you don’t know what you are talking about and have never spent any time working with minorities living in poverty.
 
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#67

SamRebel35

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#67
Anti-Woke Black Leader: ‘Post-Racial’ America Starts with Two-Parent Black Families
4
Facebook/Kendall A. Qualls
DR. SUSAN BERRY24 Nov 202112
6:43
An anti-woke black leader denounced the pervasion of racial identity in the country’s culture and urged Americans to achieve a “post-racial” state by encouraging a return to two-parent black families.
At an event sponsored in early November by the Liberty Classical Academy, Minnesota-based TakeCharge President Kendall Qualls addressed the issue of “Envisioning a Post Racial America,” and moving the nation beyond its current laser focus on racial identity.



Qualls, who speaks out regularly against Critical Race Theory, observed that on the day Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated, he was five years old, and “at that time, nearly 80 percent of black children were born in two-parent families”:
In my lifetime, we have seen the black community transformed from 80 percent two-parent families to 80 percent fatherless homes, without one national initiative to reverse the trend. If the American black family was a spotted owl or grey wolf, it would be on the endangered species list. There would be a national campaign to save the black family. There’d be galas, commercials, bumper stickers … My friends, what has happened in the black community is nothing short of a cultural genocide, and it’s the cause of 90 percent of the problems that we face in our communities. Not the mystical systemic racism. This is not the dream that Martin Luther King had in mind, and it’s been a nightmare for children. born during this time. We have been used as political pawns for 50 years and it ends tonight.​


The black leader noted to his audience that, while Americans are today “bombarded with messages, that the country is overflowing with white supremacy, systemic racism,” the truth is “we’re actually living in the least racist period in our country’s history:”
But if you listen exclusively to news media, the entertainment industry and what I like to call the academic industrial complex, you would never know the real truth. That this is the least racist period in our country’s history in one of the least racist countries in the world. So having lived through the Jim Crow South, my parents and grandparents would have loved to have grown up in the America that I grew up in.​
Qualls explained that, even within his own family of origin, a great contrast exists in the lives of his and his wife’s children and those of some of his siblings:
My children are the only ones that grew up with both a mother and a father in the home. Half their cousins have never finished high school. None have gone on to college. Half my nephews have been incarcerated. My nieces are mothers of children, having never been married. So, how do we explain these differences? Was the systemic racism built into American society? Or was it something else? Well, here you have two tales from the same family, same skin color, yet the disparities are quite broad.​
Qualls said that, while he grew up first in Harlem in New York City, and then in a trailer park in Oklahoma, where he was often called “ghetto kid” and “trailer trash,” he was motivated to get an education, which he called “the great equalizer.”
Ultimately, he began a marketing career in the healthcare industry, where, at 36 years old, he became responsible for a $94 million budget.
“Trust me, I tell people all the time, I’m no one exceptional,” Qualls told his audience. “I live in an exceptional country. And I serve an exceptional God. A story like mine can happen … only in America, but it’s happened to millions of people in this country.”


He said his experience is a stark example of how America has changed:

I know what systemic racism is. My parents and grandparents lived through systemic racism. I did not. Over the course of my life … I received help from people, personally and professionally, that didn’t look like me. I received help from people who were black and white, rich and poor, male and female, from all over the country. They helped out of the goodness of their hearts. How do I know that? Because I had nothing to give them … Americans routinely help people who are trying to better their lot in life, and they don’t put a racial filter on it.​
“If you look for racism in this country, you’ll find it,” Qualls emphasized. “But if you look for opportunity, you’ll find it 100 times over.”
He invited his audience to observe that many native-born black Americans are “blinded by the tears of anger, mistrust, and misunderstanding,” in contrast to the black Americans who have legally immigrated to the United States from the Caribbean Islands and African nations such as Nigeria.
“They earn significantly more than native born black Americans,” Qualls explained. “They achieve higher levels of education. And they are living the American Dream that civil rights leaders desired for us.”
“Many of these new citizens came to the country with intact families, which helped them with achievement and integration,” he added. “But another reason they’ve had success is they haven’t been indoctrinated by years of anti-white, anti-American, and anti-capitalist hatred.”


Qualls urged black Americans to “reconcile with the sins of our nation, re-establish two-parent families, rebuild our culture, and join other Americans around the table of prosperity as fellow citizens of this great country.”
He recommended black Americans begin this transformation by “tapping into the strength of our cultural roots of the black culture, which is linked to our Christian faith”:
Forgiveness is the cornerstone for Christianity. Just as God extends forgiveness to us in Christ, we are called to forgive others. As we take steps to forgive our country for the sins of slavery, Jim Crow laws, and many other forms of bigotry that followed, the heavy burden of bitterness, anger, resentment will be lifted from our shoulders. Our eyes will be open to clearly see the path forward, allowing us to focus on what’s best for our future, and the future of our children.​
“I want to be clear: to forgive is an act of strength, not weakness,” Qualls asserted.
“We cannot continue forth as a healthy nation, thinking we are living in two separate Americas, and pitting groups of people against each other,” he emphasized. “It is unsustainable, and it is un-American.”
“We must come together with a renewed hope in our future,” he said, “by returning to trusted foundational values that can see us through a post-racial America, foundational values and behaviors that have weathered the test of time, which include personal responsibility, strong work ethic, pride in one’s nation, faith, two-parent families, and a first-rate education that allows anyone, and yes, I do mean anyone, to achieve their dreams.”
This this this! White people can't fix the black community. Only the black community can fix itself. And it absolutely can, but it has to abandon the idea that society is actively participating to hold them down first.
 
#68

dovervolz

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#68
I do. I basically said we all need to do better.
Really? Maybe you should go back and read your own post then. Granted, I've not read all your posts. But all I ever see from you is blaming whites for everything under sun, never taking any responsibility for anything. You expect whites to " change", but you still convey your hatred for whites in almost every post. So you want change? You first.
 
#69

SamRebel35

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#69
The magic of the two parent family isn't that the child "gets more support" growing up. Ideally, it means specifically that he has a father: a man who is a model for what true masculinity is. A father teaches a son how to be a man, father, and husband, and he teaches a daughter what a husband and father ought to be. A mother's role tends to be nurturing and supporting while a father's role tends to be discipline and preparing the child to go out into the world. Without both parents, the child is getting a very unbalanced upbringing and the child is not seeing a model of a successful male/female relationship.

All of the above is "on average" with the understanding that sometimes a father is a pos and the family is better off without him. And that sometimes a single parent family raises a child who is well balanced. And that sometimes a child ends up failing in life despite having very good parents.
 
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#70

Sea Ray

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#70
I do. I basically said we all need to do better.
No, the black community aren't going to listen to us white people. That's clear. You guys just accuse us of being white supremacists and start divisive organizations like BLM. Start a group called All Lives Matter and sign me up.

The problem is in your community. Two parent households won't solve everything but it'd sure help. You also need to address crime and education in your communities. If you need my help, please be specific. Until then, get to work and I'll stay out of your way
 
#71

C-south

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#71
Which is very perplexing to me. If you actually talk to black people a lot of them have very little in common with the socialists, yet still vote for them.
You have to believe they just want to be told they’re a victim and that’s why they fell short in life. It wasn’t any of their bad decisions just the color of their skin.
 
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#72

Vol8188

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#72
Dumb and racist conclusion. Not surprised considering the source.
You don’t believe the issues of single parent households and crime are issues of culture?

I think it’s important because this is where the divide on issues such as criminal justice reform and “is policing racist” seem to come from.

The left sees 13% of the population representing 25% of those killed by police and say “there it is, racism”.

On the right we see 13% of the population committing over 50% of the homicides and believe that if they only represent 25% of people killed by police, then they’re underrepresented.

But either way the important question to first answer is what causes these issues in the black community?
 
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#75

FLVOL_79

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#75
Sure. Thanks for asking. My father agreed with your sentiment initially, but he is proof that hard-work does not cure all that ails. What I mean by equality is that it is desired it in all facets, not just opportunity. The requirement/request of help has nothing to do with intellect. We live in a capitalist society that significantly rewards head-starts. AAs are the minority here with a reputation that veers to the negative in a lot of capacities. Just look at this thread. There are generations worth of mistrust, fear, misunderstanding, and miscommunication between white and black people. We were recently more divided than anytime during my adulthood. It shouldn’t be only on one race to heal. It will take conscious actions from all parties until there is true equality.
Interesting take. So equal opportunity is not enough and you desire equal outcome? Does equal outcome have to correlate with your races representation of the total population of the USA? Or are you asking for a 50/50 split with White people? There was a country back in the day that had equal opportunity and equal outcome..the name..eludes me..they didn't make it into the 1990's though. Hmm..

I'd love to hear your take on sports with your equal outcome angle.
 
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